So Things Hit A Rough Patch And Facebook Is Ready To Throw In The Towel?

Is that how it is? NYSE Euronext and Facebook have exchanged phone calls and e-mails about the possibility of the company switching its listing from Nasdaq OMX Group, according to a person familiar with the matter. Facebook, which listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market on May 18 after completing the world’s biggest initial public offering by a technology company, is listening to the New York Stock Exchange, said the person, who asked not to be named because the discussions are private. Facebook Said To Have Talked With NYSE About Exchange Switch [Bloomberg]
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Is that how it is?

NYSE Euronext and Facebook have exchanged phone calls and e-mails about the possibility of the company switching its listing from Nasdaq OMX Group, according to a person familiar with the matter. Facebook, which listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market on May 18 after completing the world’s biggest initial public offering by a technology company, is listening to the New York Stock Exchange, said the person, who asked not to be named because the discussions are private.

Facebook Said To Have Talked With NYSE About Exchange Switch [Bloomberg]

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What If Mark Zuckerberg Wore A 3-Piece Suit And A Monocle To The Facebook Roadshow?

What if Mark Zuckerberg wore cutoff jean shorts and a mesh Hawaii 69 football jersey to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a Mr. Peanut costume to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a tuxedo tee-shirt to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg dressed as Robocop for the IPO roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore Crocs to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg entered the roadshow as a member of the Lollipop Guild? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore Capri pants to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a wetsuit to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a Lacoste polo with an argyle sweater wrapped around his neck to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore the Hannibal Lechter mask from Silence of the Lambs to the Facebook roadshow? Would things have turned out differently? If Zuckerberg had left the hoodie at home? One guy says yes. "I felt that had Mr. Zuckerberg worn a jacket instead of a hoodie (showing them that he respected them enough to "dress up"), he would have made a statement to them that he cares about their needs, and will act in their best interest. He chose not to make that statement, and the current share price demonstrates that investors have chosen not to support Facebook shares. All of this is iterative. Had Facebook issued 10 million shares instead of 421 million, the stock would probably be much higher. However, had Mr. Zuckerberg worn a jacket and reassured investors that he is aligned with their expectations, perhaps more people would be stepping in to buy now." So...yeah.

Confidential To The Haters: Check Back In With James Gorman About Facebook In A Year

Until then, step off, bitch. Morgan Stanley Chairman and Chief Executive James Gorman defended the securities firm's role in Facebook's tumultuous initial public offering, telling employees internally that the firm worked "100% within the rules" and calling the steep decline in Facebook's stock "disappointing." Mr. Gorman, in a weekly strategy meeting Tuesday that was later webcast to employees, said "speculation of nefarious activity" surrounding the social networking company's IPO is untrue. Contrary to some reports, he said, he wasn't "aware of any dissent" among the underwriting firms regarding Facebook's IPO price of $38 a share. The discussion, called a strategy forum, is held weekly at the firm. The event, which Mr. Gorman attends periodically, features commentary from analysts and economists and is linked to on the company's internal website. Mr. Gorman told employees to "be proud of the job your colleagues did [in the Facebook IPO process] and don't judge us based upon what happened over a couple of days." Commenting on Facebook's stock performance, Mr. Gorman acknowledged the first day of trading "matters" but added investors should also judge an IPO based on its share price after 30 days, 90 days and 12 months. Morgan Stanley Chief Defends Facebook Handling [WSJ]

Nasdaq Officials Would Just Like To Point Out That Anyone Who Lost Money As A Result Of The Exchange's Incompetence Have Little To No Legal Recourse

Oh you can try a lawsuit but, historically speaking, it won't do shit. Nasdaq is sending a message to firms weighing lawsuits related to trading losses in Facebook's initial public offering: winning won't be easy. The exchange operator believes it is protected by its contracts with members and by its unusual legal status, which is rooted in its dual role as a regulatory body as well as a business that makes money running markets. Exchange officials in recent weeks have pointed out to analysts that Nasdaq has never been successfully sued over a trading error. "When you look at member agreements that people sign, it's quite explicit that they're bound by that accommodation policy," Robert Greifeld, Nasdaq's chief executive, said last week at a Sandler O'Neill + Partners conference, referring to legal agreements capping the exchange's payouts linked to system problems...Banks and brokers have estimated they lost hundreds of millions of dollars due to technical problems during Facebook's May 18 debut. The glitches forced Nasdaq to delay Facebook's opening, and left trades involving millions of shares unconfirmed for hours. Amid the chaos, traders were forced to guess their positions and place additional orders based on those estimates. When Nasdaq delivered the results of the trading Friday afternoon, many firms were caught off guard and scrambled to reposition. According to Greifeld, the last guy who tried to get his money back "trades on the pink sheets now" but take your best shot. Nasdaq Claims Strong Defense [WSJ] Related: UBS Not Sweating The Small Stuff

Facebook CFO Could Use A Little Help Here

Anyone know anything about drumming up interest in a stock that's down over 45 percent since going public? Wanna help him out after this lockup period ends? No? He could use a little assistance here. Needs a little help. Flew all the way to New York to just come flat out and say "help me." Facebook Chief Financial Officer David Ebersman is meeting with investors in New York today, a person familiar with the matter said, days before the lifting of a ban on stock sales by some of the company’s biggest shareholders. The person asked not to be identified because the meetings are private. Through yesterday, Facebook had tumbled 45 percent since the company sold shares at $38 in a May 17 initial public offering. The lockup on the first block of shares held by insiders expires on Aug. 16. Facebook, which hasn’t closed above the IPO price since its first trading day, needs to reassure investors that it can increase revenue from advertising as more of its almost 1 billion users access the social-networking service on mobile phones, said Victor Anthony, an analyst at Topeka Capital Markets in New York, in an interview. “Investors who bought into the IPO have lost billions of dollars,” Anthony said. “He needs to get out there and tell the story of how he’ll drive revenue growth.” Facebook CFO Said To Meet With Investors Before Lockup Expiration [Bloomberg]