Zoe Cruz To Shutter Hedge Fund

Don't cry for the Cruz-Missile, though. Apparently she's already strategizing her next move. Cruz is said to have been struggling to raise anything beyond the initial $200 million she obtained from Voras Capital investors, the source said. The source said the decision to return investor money was made recently and all clients would get their money "promptly." Cruz's hedge fund, which began raising money and recruiting employees in 2009 formally opened in 2010, was down 8 percent last year, the sources added...The source said Cruz is fielding job inquiries in the finance industry, but has not made any decisions. Zoe Cruz's Voras Capital To Close [Reuters/Katya Wachtel]
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Don't cry for the Cruz-Missile, though. Apparently she's already strategizing her next move.

Cruz is said to have been struggling to raise anything beyond the initial $200 million she obtained from Voras Capital investors, the source said. The source said the decision to return investor money was made recently and all clients would get their money "promptly." Cruz's hedge fund, which began raising money and recruiting employees in 2009 formally opened in 2010, was down 8 percent last year, the sources added...The source said Cruz is fielding job inquiries in the finance industry, but has not made any decisions.

Zoe Cruz's Voras Capital To Close [Reuters/Katya Wachtel]

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Wall Street Bank That Might Consider Entering The Witness Protection Program Screws Zoe Cruz Out Of A Job For The Second Time

[caption id="attachment_76125" align="alignleft" width="260" caption="How people smile when they're plotting cutting your brake lines."][/caption] Earlier this week, it was announced that Zoe Cruz would be closing her hedge fund, Voras Capital Management. Cruz started the fund in 2010, a few years after she was famously fired by John Mack at Morgan Stanley (where she was co-President), for reasons that remain unclear to this day but include theories like: a) the belief that she was responsible for losing the firm a few billion dollars b) a lot of people disliked her-- including this guy named Vikram Pandi who was "not a fan"-- and told Mack they would leave if he made Cruz CEO c) Mack had to blame either himself or Cruz for some losses and he chose her. d) She was, you know, a girl, and the boys didn’t like that. Regardless, the ousting was probably mildly to majorly humiliating for ZC and since Mack-- who she was extremely close with prior to the personnel change-- was the one who told her to hit the bricks, it would have been fair to assume she spent a least a little time fantasizing about  sticking pins in a Mack voodoo doll and/or slashing his tires. In 2009, though, Mack and Zoe had lunch and she told him she wanted to start a hedge fund. And maybe it was it was the fact that he was feeling nostalgic, maybe it was the fact that tragedy + time = comedy, maybe it was the fact that he was still riding high from "saving" Morgan Stanley, maybe it was the wine, maybe it was that he was feeling bad about the unceremonious canning and thought "Oh, why not just give the poor girl some money" but Mack went back to the office and "told bank executives that he would like to help her start her new investment business, according to people familiar with the matter." And when they said, "But John, didn't you fire her for supposedly taking on too much risk and losing the firm $4 billion," he said "[Well], her track record was a very good track record." So Morgan Stanley gave Cruz $20 million and she was on her way. And while we can't say for sure, and we're not suggesting money necessarily heals all wounds, the $20 million and the stamp of approval and the fact that she could say to investors she was trying to raise money from ,"Hey look, even the guy who fired me wants in" probably helped smooth things over and improve MS's standing in the Cruz-missile's eyes. She likely even had nice things to say about her former employer at social gatherings! And then this happened: Last month, Morgan Stanley asked for its money back, disappointed by the hedge fund's performance and worried about the shrinking size of Ms. Cruz's firm, according to people familiar with the matter...The retreat by Morgan Stanley was part of broader moves to sell off assets that Chief Executive James Gorman felt exposed the company to unnecessary risk or otherwise didn't serve clients, the people said...On Thursday, the 57-year-old Ms. Cruz told clients in a letter that she has decided to close down Voras Capital Management. The letter cited "the difficult capital-raising environment for new funds and the enormous uncertainty and volatility in the markets," according to a person who saw the letter. It was signed by Ms. Cruz. Oooo, that's not good. In fact, it's worse than if they'd never given her the $20 mill at all. But to give and take back? Yikes. All those nice things Cruz said about MS and Co? Strike them from the record because they are so over! Don't call, don't write, don't cry don't beg 'cause you're done! Finished! Morgan Stanely Bailed On Firm [WSJ]

So Long As John Paulson Doesn't Work Up The Nerve To Send That Redemption Letter To A Certain Hedge Fund Located At 1251 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY, 10020, Paulson & Co. Will Be Around For Years To Come

Was 2011 a very kind year to John Paulson? No, it was not. Is 2012 shaping up to be any different? Not really, no. His proclamation that last year's losses were but an “aberration” has not exactly been backed by the fact that AP was down 16 percent through June, Morgan Stanley’s prime brokerage put Paulson and Co. on a list of firms it warns clients not to invest with, and a few clients have not only quit the fund but told anybody who will listen that leaving was one of the best decisions they've ever made. Also not great is the fact that assets under management have declined 44.9 percent to $17 billion from $38.1 billion, due to a combination of unfortunate performance and redemptions. Happily, though, there is a silver lining that perhaps few people have thought of, namely that John Paulson's got mucho of his own dinero in the firm and he hasn't given up on the place yet. ...the firm has a saving grace: About 60%, or $12.6 billion of June 30 assets are from employees. Observers said it is impossible to know how much of that employee asset pool belongs to John Paulson, the firm's founder and president, but they speculate it is the vast majority. (By contrast, about 31% or 32% of Paulson & Co.'s assets are from institutional investors.) One source said the hedge fund manager's size at its peak — before the performance decline — combined with the high percentage of employee capital have insulated Paulson from the crippling impacts that performance declines of this size and client redemptions would wreak on other firms. “It's impossible for any other hedge fund firm to lose $17 billion and still be in business,” said the source, who asked for anonymity. “The firm will not fall apart because of this. Just John (Paulson's) money alone is enough to keep the firm in business. But he is not going anywhere. There are absolutely no signs that John Paulson intends to do anything other than manage his way out of this.” This scenario would also have to assume that the firm stops losing money but regardless, suck on the above, New Mexico. Paulson Tries To Bounce Back [P&I via Dealbook]

Four Years After Shuttering Fund, Long Island Asset Manager/Hooters Franchise Owner/Frederick's Of Hollywood Devotee Not Ready To Part With Investor Money Just Yet

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Kleinhenz Capital Shuttering Leaves Void In The "Hedge Fund Managers Who Have No Qualms About Driving Their Adversary's Kia Sorento Into A Pond" Field

Last Friday, Bloomberg reported that Kleinheinz Capital Partners had written investors to inform them that the firm would be closing up shop, on account of founder John Kleinheinz's no longer "enjoying running running the fund" as much as he used to. And while JK is certainly not the first hedge fund manager to throw in the towel or to blame "central bank and government intervention for reducing volatility and making macro investing more difficult," and there are obviously enough people left in the industry to manage people's money, this particular account of calling it quits should leave you slightly misty-eyed, for one reason: the hedge fund community has lost the guy that did this (and, noting the less than apologetic apology, would do it again?):