Facebook CFO Could Use A Little Help Here

Anyone know anything about drumming up interest in a stock that's down over 45 percent since going public? Wanna help him out after this lockup period ends? No? He could use a little assistance here. Needs a little help. Flew all the way to New York to just come flat out and say "help me." Facebook Chief Financial Officer David Ebersman is meeting with investors in New York today, a person familiar with the matter said, days before the lifting of a ban on stock sales by some of the company’s biggest shareholders. The person asked not to be identified because the meetings are private. Through yesterday, Facebook had tumbled 45 percent since the company sold shares at $38 in a May 17 initial public offering. The lockup on the first block of shares held by insiders expires on Aug. 16. Facebook, which hasn’t closed above the IPO price since its first trading day, needs to reassure investors that it can increase revenue from advertising as more of its almost 1 billion users access the social-networking service on mobile phones, said Victor Anthony, an analyst at Topeka Capital Markets in New York, in an interview. “Investors who bought into the IPO have lost billions of dollars,” Anthony said. “He needs to get out there and tell the story of how he’ll drive revenue growth.” Facebook CFO Said To Meet With Investors Before Lockup Expiration [Bloomberg]
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Anyone know anything about drumming up interest in a stock that's down over 45 percent since going public? Wanna help him out after this lockup period ends? No? He could use a little assistance here. Needs a little help. Flew all the way to New York to just come flat out and say "help me."

Facebook Chief Financial Officer David Ebersman is meeting with investors in New York today, a person familiar with the matter said, days before the lifting of a ban on stock sales by some of the company’s biggest shareholders. The person asked not to be identified because the meetings are private. Through yesterday, Facebook had tumbled 45 percent since the company sold shares at $38 in a May 17 initial public offering. The lockup on the first block of shares held by insiders expires on Aug. 16.

Facebook, which hasn’t closed above the IPO price since its first trading day, needs to reassure investors that it can increase revenue from advertising as more of its almost 1 billion users access the social-networking service on mobile phones, said Victor Anthony, an analyst at Topeka Capital Markets in New York, in an interview. ��Investors who bought into the IPO have lost billions of dollars,” Anthony said. “He needs to get out there and tell the story of how he’ll drive revenue growth.”

Facebook CFO Said To Meet With Investors Before Lockup Expiration [Bloomberg]

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Confidential To The Haters: Check Back In With James Gorman About Facebook In A Year

Until then, step off, bitch. Morgan Stanley Chairman and Chief Executive James Gorman defended the securities firm's role in Facebook's tumultuous initial public offering, telling employees internally that the firm worked "100% within the rules" and calling the steep decline in Facebook's stock "disappointing." Mr. Gorman, in a weekly strategy meeting Tuesday that was later webcast to employees, said "speculation of nefarious activity" surrounding the social networking company's IPO is untrue. Contrary to some reports, he said, he wasn't "aware of any dissent" among the underwriting firms regarding Facebook's IPO price of $38 a share. The discussion, called a strategy forum, is held weekly at the firm. The event, which Mr. Gorman attends periodically, features commentary from analysts and economists and is linked to on the company's internal website. Mr. Gorman told employees to "be proud of the job your colleagues did [in the Facebook IPO process] and don't judge us based upon what happened over a couple of days." Commenting on Facebook's stock performance, Mr. Gorman acknowledged the first day of trading "matters" but added investors should also judge an IPO based on its share price after 30 days, 90 days and 12 months. Morgan Stanley Chief Defends Facebook Handling [WSJ]

So Things Hit A Rough Patch And Facebook Is Ready To Throw In The Towel?

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What If Mark Zuckerberg Wore A 3-Piece Suit And A Monocle To The Facebook Roadshow?

What if Mark Zuckerberg wore cutoff jean shorts and a mesh Hawaii 69 football jersey to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a Mr. Peanut costume to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a tuxedo tee-shirt to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg dressed as Robocop for the IPO roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore Crocs to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg entered the roadshow as a member of the Lollipop Guild? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore Capri pants to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a wetsuit to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore a Lacoste polo with an argyle sweater wrapped around his neck to the Facebook roadshow? What if Mark Zuckerberg wore the Hannibal Lechter mask from Silence of the Lambs to the Facebook roadshow? Would things have turned out differently? If Zuckerberg had left the hoodie at home? One guy says yes. "I felt that had Mr. Zuckerberg worn a jacket instead of a hoodie (showing them that he respected them enough to "dress up"), he would have made a statement to them that he cares about their needs, and will act in their best interest. He chose not to make that statement, and the current share price demonstrates that investors have chosen not to support Facebook shares. All of this is iterative. Had Facebook issued 10 million shares instead of 421 million, the stock would probably be much higher. However, had Mr. Zuckerberg worn a jacket and reassured investors that he is aligned with their expectations, perhaps more people would be stepping in to buy now." So...yeah.

Chuck Schumer Is Ruining Facebook IPO Day For One Shareholder

As you may have heard, earlier this afternoon, Facebook priced its initial public offering at $38/share, valuing co-founder Eduardo Saverin's stake at approximately $2.9 billion. Since Saverin conveniently renounced his US citizenship last week, he will avoid paying millions in capital gains taxes and hang on to an estimated $67-$100 million that would have otherwise gone to the government, news that did not sit right with Chuck Schumer. Did the Senator from New York call the guy a "piece of shit miscreant"? No. Did he send him an email that included the line, "fuck with me and you will have a huge asshole"? No. But Schumer was inspired to create draft legislation aimed at tax-dodging ex-pats like Saverin and to let the kid know he makes him sick. Democratic Sens. Chuck Schumer (N.Y.) and Bob Casey (Pa.), who called Saverin's decision "despicable," said the Facebook co-founder stands to save $67 to $100 million in taxes by renouncing his citizenship. "Senator Casey and I have a status update for him: pay your taxes in full," Schumer said at a press conference on Capitol Hill. Their so-called "Ex-PATRIOT Act" would impose a mandatory 30 percent tax on American investments for those who renounce their citizenship and would also prohibit individuals like Saverin from re-entering the country. The law -- which only applies to individuals with a net worth of over $2 million or an average income tax liability of at least $148,000 -- would not apply to non-American investments by former citizens. Under the proposed legislation, the IRS would decide soon after an individual relinquishes his or her citizenship if the renouncement was motivated by tax avoidance. The individual would then have the opportunity to provide reasons for the renouncement, but there would be a "strong presumption" the move was for tax purposes. "Mr. Saverin has decided to 'defriend' the United States of America just to avoid paying his taxes," Schumer said, showing his familiarity with Facebook's lingo. [NYP]