A Little Perspective...

From time to time around these parts, when things get particularly rough, we like to take a few moments to get a little perspective. Yes, you could be facing a significantly reduced bonus. Yes, you could be facing layoffs. Yes, you could be facing a class-action lawsuit by your investors, not to mention first-degree murder charges. But you're not this guy and for that you should be thankful. Patrick Gallagher, of Lansdale, Penn., has filed a $50,000 lawsuit against the Philadelphia-area Penthouse Club claiming a stripper injured him so severely during an on-stage dance that he was left with internal bleeding from a ruptured bladder. Gallagher’s friends had gone all-out for his bachelor party back in 2010, getting him the “bachelor’s package” which included a special performance from a stripper. During the dance, Gallagher was laying flat on the stage when a stripper slid down a pole “with such force” that she ruptured his bladder upon landing, the lawsuit said. His lawyer, Neil T. Murray, said the woman came from a “great height.” After the hard stripper landing, the injured soon-to-be groom called it a night. The next morning he went to the hospital where he was advised of his injuries and underwent surgery, the lawsuit said. Gallagher also says he suffered nerve damage to his back and hip. Pennsylvania man sues strip club, claims he was severely injured by dancer
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From time to time around these parts, when things get particularly rough, we like to take a few moments to get a little perspective. Yes, you could be facing a significantly reduced bonus. Yes, you could be facing layoffs. Yes, you could be facing a class-action lawsuit by your investors, not to mention first-degree murder charges. But you're not this guy and for that you should be thankful.

Patrick Gallagher, of Lansdale, Penn., has filed a $50,000 lawsuit against the Philadelphia-area Penthouse Club claiming a stripper injured him so severely during an on-stage dance that he was left with internal bleeding from a ruptured bladder. Gallagher’s friends had gone all-out for his bachelor party back in 2010, getting him the “bachelor’s package” which included a special performance from a stripper. During the dance, Gallagher was laying flat on the stage when a stripper slid down a pole “with such force” that she ruptured his bladder upon landing, the lawsuit said. His lawyer, Neil T. Murray, said the woman came from a “great height.” After the hard stripper landing, the injured soon-to-be groom called it a night. The next morning he went to the hospital where he was advised of his injuries and underwent surgery, the lawsuit said. Gallagher also says he suffered nerve damage to his back and hip.

Pennsylvania man sues strip club, claims he was severely injured by dancer [NYDN]

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