Deutsche Bank Executive Sought Counsel From Semi-Helpful LAPD Re: Bath Salts Prior To Ruthless Beating, Arrest

"How long does this stuff stay in your system?" After he was badly injured in May by two LAPD officers, top Deutsche Bank executive Brian C. Mulligan alleged that police manufactured a report that painted him as a snarling, thrashing man who told the officers that he'd recently ingested drugs known as "bath salts." But days before the May confrontation, Mulligan apparently told another officer in a different city a story similar to what appears in the LAPD report. He said he'd previously snorted "white lightning," a type of bath salts, a synthetic drug, and believed that a helicopter had been trailing him, according to a Glendale police recording of the conversation. "I know this is gonna sound crazy, but I feel like there are people following me. I feel like there was a chopper, do you hear a chopper?" Mulligan said on the recording, which was obtained by The Times. "We don't have a helicopter up in Glendale," the officer replied.Officials with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, which represents LAPD officers, said the recording undercuts Mulligan's version of his altercation with the LAPD officers, the subject of a $50-million claim he filed with the city, which is a precursor to a lawsuit...Mulligan alleged that the officers dragged him to a motel, threatened to kill him if he left and then, when they discovered he'd escaped, beat him so badly that he suffered 15 fractures to his nose and needed dozens of stitches. Mulligan said he felt "a little paranoid" during the sometimes-rambling, 11-minute exchange. He told the officer that he'd recently purchased some bath salts at local pot shops. Mulligan said he'd snorted bath salts at least 20 times but, as of that day, had not used any for roughly two weeks. "How long does this stuff stay in your...system, man, how's it legal!" he said on the recording...The officer described bath salts as "a close relative of methamphetamine" and encouraged him to see a doctor or drug counselor. "I mean, my wife knows," Mulligan said. "OK," the officer replied, "you need to get on top of this before it gets on top of you." ‘Paranoid’ bank exec told officer he used bath salts, police say [LA Times] Earlier: Deutsche Bank Managing Director, LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On Savage Beating “Incident”
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"How long does this stuff stay in your system?"

After he was badly injured in May by two LAPD officers, top Deutsche Bank executive Brian C. Mulligan alleged that police manufactured a report that painted him as a snarling, thrashing man who told the officers that he'd recently ingested drugs known as "bath salts." But days before the May confrontation, Mulligan apparently told another officer in a different city a story similar to what appears in the LAPD report. He said he'd previously snorted "white lightning," a type of bath salts, a synthetic drug, and believed that a helicopter had been trailing him, according to a Glendale police recording of the conversation. "I know this is gonna sound crazy, but I feel like there are people following me. I feel like there was a chopper, do you hear a chopper?" Mulligan said on the recording, which was obtained by The Times. "We don't have a helicopter up in Glendale," the officer replied.Officials with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, which represents LAPD officers, said the recording undercuts Mulligan's version of his altercation with the LAPD officers, the subject of a $50-million claim he filed with the city, which is a precursor to a lawsuit...Mulligan alleged that the officers dragged him to a motel, threatened to kill him if he left and then, when they discovered he'd escaped, beat him so badly that he suffered 15 fractures to his nose and needed dozens of stitches.

Mulligan said he felt "a little paranoid" during the sometimes-rambling, 11-minute exchange. He told the officer that he'd recently purchased some bath salts at local pot shops. Mulligan said he'd snorted bath salts at least 20 times but, as of that day, had not used any for roughly two weeks. "How long does this stuff stay in your...system, man, how's it legal!" he said on the recording...The officer described bath salts as "a close relative of methamphetamine" and encouraged him to see a doctor or drug counselor. "I mean, my wife knows," Mulligan said. "OK," the officer replied, "you need to get on top of this before it gets on top of you."

‘Paranoid’ bank exec told officer he used bath salts, police say [LA Times]
Earlier: Deutsche Bank Managing Director, LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On Savage Beating “Incident”

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Former Deutsche Bank Exec And LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On "Savage Beating" Incident

According to the police, they found Brian Mulligan high on bath salts after "several" calls had been placed about a man in the area "trying to break into cars" that fit Mulligan's description. He supposedly told them he was "tired," which they say is why they drove him to a motel to get some shuteye. When he (allegedly) emerged hours later and started running through traffic despite officers' orders to get out of the street, later assuming a "fight stance," they decided it was necessary to deal with him in an aggressive manner. Didn't want to, felt they owed it to him. According to Mulligan, this is what happened:

Authorities Would Like To Add That Deutsche Bank Executive "Ruthlessly Beaten" By LAPD May Or May Not Have Been On "White Lightning" At The Time

A couple weeks back, Deutsche Bank vice chairman and managing director Brian Mulligan filed a claim with the city of Los Angeles, letting people know he intended to sue for $50 million over an incident that took place involving the LAPD, which left the media banker with “a broken shoulder blade and 15 nasal fractures.” According to Mulligan, police officers abducted him from a street corner, drove him to a motel, told him to wait there for a few hours, and then beat him so "ruthlessly" he "barely looked human" when they were done. According the LAPD, several calls had been placed about a man in the area "trying to break into cars" that fit Mulligan's description. They confronted the guy, who told them he was tired, which was why they drove him to the motel. He emerged hours later, started running through traffic, failed to heed their orders to get out of the street and assumed a "fighting stance," hence the need to deal with him in an aggressive fashion. At the time, a spokesman for the LA County DA’s office said that there are no plans to file criminal charges and that the office would simply like to “have a discussion" with Mulligan to advise him on "how best to follow the law so that incidents like this don’t occur again.” Also, it's possible he was experimenting with bath salts. The police report states that Mulligan was sweating profusely and walking with an unsteady gait when officers responded to reports that he was trying to break into cars in a Jack-in-the-Box parking lot. Mulligan told officers he was being chased and didn't know why. He also stated that he had ingested "white lightning" and marijuana and that he had not slept for four days. Brian Mulligan On Bath Salts: Deutsche Bank Executive Said He Was On 'White Lightning,' Police Say [HP] Earlier: Deutsche Bank Managing Director, LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On Savage Beating “Incident”

Deutsche Bank Managing Director, LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On Savage Beating "Incident"

Yesterday afternoon, Deutsche Bank vice chairman and managing director Brian Mulligan filed a claim with the city of Los Angeles, letting it be known that he plans on suing for $50 million, over an altercation with the LAPD that left Mulligan with "a broken shoulder blade and 15 nasal fractures." According to the media banker, he was minding his own business one night in May, when a couple of officers approached him, asked him what he was doing in the vicinity of a marijuana dispensary, searched his car (where they found a few thousand dollars), drove him to a motel and told him to wait there. Several hours later, still waiting, Mulligan says he started to become suspicious and decided to leave, at which point the officers returned and "began ruthlessly beating him" so badly he "barely looked human" when they were done. If this had happened to you, you might be a little upset too! The LAPD, however, claims that Mulligan has no reason to be angry with them and, in fact, owes the officers an apology, for his "outburst of erratic behavior." The police version begins with a complaint about a man going through cars in a Jack-in-the-Box in the Highland Park area, according to LAPD Officer Cleon Joseph. Moments later, a second call came from another person about a man in the same area who appeared to be on drugs and trying to break into cars...The officers determined Mulligan matched the description of the suspect, but a police drug recognition expert determined he was not under the influence of drugs. Joseph said he could not clarify whether that included alcohol. Officers then searched Mulligan's car and found thousands of dollars, Joseph said. Mulligan told the officers that he was exhausted, so the officers agreed to transport him to a motel, Joseph said. But first, they had to count the executive's cash to make sure it was all still there after they transported him to the hotel, Joseph explained. The officers gave Mulligan's money back to him, drove him to the motel and left him, concluding their response, Joseph said. A few hours later, at about 1 a.m., police received another call from the same area, this time about a man running in traffic. Officers observed Mulligan in the street, Joseph said. He defied officers' orders to get out of the street, and instead went into a fighting stance and charged at the officers, according to Joseph. Officers tackled Mulligan and took control of him, Joseph said. During the take-down, the executive sustained injuries that required hospitalization. Police reported the incident as a categorical use of force and are conducting a standard investigation to determine if the force was necessary. Mulligan was charged with resisting arrest and interfering with law enforcement. He was booked on $25,000 bail and was released from jail on May 18. Despite Mulligan acting in such a way that some people thought required "force" to deal with, a spokesman for the LA County DA's office said that there are no plans to file criminal charges and that the office would simply like to "have a discussion with him and advise him on how best to follow the law so that incidents like this don’t occur again." Brian Mulligan, Deutsche Bank Executive, Says He'll Sue LAPD Alleging Captive Beating [HP] Deutsche Bank Top Hollywood Banker Claims Police Beating [Bloomberg]

Former Online Brokerage Chief Offers Handy How-To-Guide Re: Getting Banned From The Securities Industry

Regardless of what you think of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a good rule of thumb is that if you are regulated by the agency, you probably don't want to go out of your way to unnecessarily insult and/or anger it. In fact, to play it safe, you might want to just show the place complete and total deference, whether you're violating its rules or not. This is an attitude that many a hedge fund manager has adopted over the years, some of their own volition, others by strong advisement. Then you have Sheldon Maschler. The former chief trader of Datek Online, who in 2003 paid a $29.2 million fine and was banned from the securities industry, took a different approach. From Wall Street Journal reporter Scott Patterson's new book, Dark Pools: During the hearings, Maschler displayed a stunning irrevenerce toward the regulators. One day, he showed up in bathing trunks and a T-shirt that read NASDAQ SUCKS. The judge, outraged, tossed him out, telling him to come back in a different shirt the following day. Maschler did as ordered-- wearing a T-shirt that read NASDAQ SUCKS in different colors. Regulators were quickly crawling all over Maschler's ragtag office. One day, a typical one in the market for Datek, each trader sat staring at his Watcher in Maschler's basement, all decked out in their standard work uniform-- baggy shorts, T-shirts, tennis shoes or flip-flops. Suddenly, they all noticed an odd presence in the room: two men in crisp suits looming over the stairwell door. Maschler exploded like a grenade. "Who...the FUCK...are YOU!" he screamed, jumping from his seat and jabbing his Macanudo in the air. "We're from the SEC," one of the suits said. "We're looking for Sheldon Maschler." "Who the FUCK let you in!" "The door was open." "If my fly was open, would you suck my dick?" The Datek traders buckled in their seats, struggling to contain their laughter. "Now get upstairs and RING THE FUCKING BELL!" Maschler roared. The two SEC officials sheepishly crept back upstairs-- and rang the bell. Maschler pressed the intercom buttom. "Hello, who is it?" he said calmly. There was a pause. Then, "It's the SEC." "Come on down!" Maschler greeted them warmly, all smiles, backslapping. "Now, wasn't that easier?" he said, waving around his Macanudo and blowing smoke into their faces.