CR Intrinsic PM Arrested On Insider Trading Charges Can Take Solace In Knowing He Is Peerless In His Field

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Former SAC Capital Advisors LP portfolio manager Mathew Martoma was charged in what U.S. prosecutors called “the most lucrative insider-trading scheme ever,” netting as much as $276 million while at the hedge fund. Prosecutors in the office of U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara in Manhattan today unsealed a complaint charging Martoma with trading on illicit tips about Alzheimer’s disease drug-trial results from 2006 to 2008. Martoma is accused of arranging trades in shares of Wyeth LLC and Elan Corp., making $220 million in profits and avoiding $56 million in losses for an unnamed hedge fund. Martoma is charged with one count of conspiracy and two counts of securities. Mathew Martoma, 38, of Boca Raton, Florida, worked for CR Intrinsic Investors in Stamford, Connecticut, a unit of SAC Capital, according to a civil complaint lawsuit filed against him by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Martoma allegedly engaged in the misconduct while at CR Intrinsic, according to the SEC complaint. [Bloomberg, WSJ, Complaint]

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Doctor Who Tipped Off SAC Manager Wasn't Conspicuous About His Wealth Except When He Was Telling Strangers On Planes About All The Fancy Hotels And Limo Rides Insider Trading Afforded Him

As you may have heard, in addition to the salary he was paid by the University of Michigan, Dr. Sidney Gilman made about $100,000/year through his side-gig advising "a wide network of Wall Street traders."  That network included included Mathew Martoma, recently charged with running “the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever,” based on the information he received from Gilman, who made it a habit of leaking highly confidential information to the former SAC Capital employee. While most people that engage in fraud can't help but spend their ill-gotten gains in a flashy way that attracts unwanted attention (expensive cars, private jets, chinchilla fur coats) the Times reports that Sid Gilman's supplementary income "was not readily apparent in his lifestyle in Michigan." For instance, no second home and no bragging to his colleagues about his life on Wall Street. Still, on at least one occasion, the doctor couldn't help but let the underage girl sitting next to him on a flight home know that she was in the presence of a BSD.