Long Term Capital Management Founder To Impart Infinite Wisdom Re: Perils Of Lax Risk Management

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Long-Term Capital Management co-founder Robert Merton, former Maverick Capital chief macroeconomic strategist Steve Galbraith and Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Andrew Lo were recently named by the U.S. Treasury to serve on the Financial Research Advisory Committee of the Office of Financial Research. The Dodd-Frank Act established the OFR within Treasury to "serve the Financial Stability Oversight Council, its member agencies, and the public by improving the quality, transparency, and accessibility of financial data and information; conducting and sponsoring research related to financial stability; and promoting best practices in risk management," according to a Treasury statement. [Hedge Fund Intelligence]

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