Doug Whitman is Sorry

Sorry that he is going to prison. Because he certainly doesn't sound—through counsel—like he's sorry about the insider-trading that he was convicted of in August.
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Sorry that he is going to prison. Because he certainly doesn't sound—through counsel—like he's sorry about the insider-trading that he was convicted of in August.

“Doug Whitman maintains his innocence and looks forward to vindication on appeal,” David Anderson, another Whitman lawyer, said in a statement.

Whitman had better hope that the judges on the Second Circuit see things differently from Rakoff, who called the evidence against him "quite overwhelming," and who used his sentencing to accuse Whitman of a felony that he was not charged with.

“I think, frankly, he repeatedly perjured himself,” Rakoff said.

Rakoff began his soliloquy by calling Whitman "basically a decent person" before trying to erase any doubt that the former hedge fund manager was quite the opposite. As far as the Honorable Judge Rakoff is concerned, Whitman

was “cavalier and crude in his business dealings even when he wasn’t breaking the law.”

“Mr. Whitman was someone who had no compunctions about going across illegal lines that he was very well aware of and excusing them and even bringing those excuses into the courtroom when that served his interests,” Rakoff said.

Whitman Capital Founder Gets 2 Years for Insider Trading [Bloomberg]
Former Hedge-Fund Manager Is Sentenced [WSJ]

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