Barclays CEO Promises To Clear Out His Desk In Hypothetical Scenario In Which Bank Decides To Start Engaging In Rampant Fraud Again

Mr. Jenkins and the firm’s chairman, David Walker, told politicians on Tuesday that they were prioritizing ethics and reducing risky trading activity, adding that they would take responsibility if future problems were discovered at the bank. The Barclays’ chief, who agreed to forgo his bonus in response to the series of scandals that have hit Barclays in recent years, said he would resign if another scandal was uncovered while he was leading the bank. “The chief executive is responsible for what happens during their tenure and when incidents happen the price needs to be paid and I believe were I to find myself in that position I would do the right thing,” Mr. Jenkins said on Tuesday. When politicians asked Mr. Jenkins if he was eradicating the culture that he inherited from his predecessor Robert E. Diamond Jr., Barclays’ new chief said he was indeed “shredding that legacy” of sometimes being “too self-centered and too aggressive.” [Dealbook]
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Mr. Jenkins and the firm’s chairman, David Walker, told politicians on Tuesday that they were prioritizing ethics and reducing risky trading activity, adding that they would take responsibility if future problems were discovered at the bank. The Barclays’ chief, who agreed to forgo his bonus in response to the series of scandals that have hit Barclays in recent years, said he would resign if another scandal was uncovered while he was leading the bank. “The chief executive is responsible for what happens during their tenure and when incidents happen the price needs to be paid and I believe were I to find myself in that position I would do the right thing,” Mr. Jenkins said on Tuesday. When politicians asked Mr. Jenkins if he was eradicating the culture that he inherited from his predecessor Robert E. Diamond Jr., Barclays’ new chief said he was indeed “shredding that legacy” of sometimes being “too self-centered and too aggressive.” [Dealbook, related]

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Bob Diamond Lieutenant Jerry Del Missier Ended Up Faring A Bit Better In The Parting Gifts Department Than The Boss

The bad news is that former Barclays chief operating officer Jerry del Missier is still out of a job and it may be some time before he gets a new one, on account of "investigations conducted by American and British authorities [demonstrating] he was a central figure" in the scandal du jour and "asked other bank officials to lower the firm’s submissions to Libor." The good news is that Jer is still (probably) getting paid, unlike some people he knows. Barclays was mired in fresh controversy on Wednesday night after handing almost £9m to a top banker who left following the Libor scandal and after one of its highest profile non-executive directors suddenly quit, taking the toll at the top to four. Jerry del Missier, who resigned after telling subordinates to reduce the bank's Libor submission during the October 2008 banking crisis, was reported to have been handed £8.75m cash as part of his leaving package. Shadow Treasury minister Chris Leslie called on del Missier to follow Diamond and waive the bulk of his payoff. "Having resigned from Barclays over the Libor fixing scandal, people will find the scale of this award completely inappropriate. Bob Diamond rightly waived most of his pay off and Mr del Missier ought to do the same," Leslie said. £9m leaving deal for Barclays deputy Jerry del Missier [Guardian] Former Top Barclays Official in Line for $13.6 Million Payout [Dealbook]

Financial Services Authority Had Doubts About This Bob Diamond Character Back In 2010

The regulator didn't specifically suspect anything re: propensity for manipulating Libor, just a general feeling it couldn't necessarily trust the guy, which Barclays chairman Marcus Agius conceded was not entirely off base. On Wednesday a British parliamentary committee release an internal record from the Financial Services Authority dating back to September 2010. The note details a discussion between Barclays Chairman Marcus Agius and then FSA chief Hector Sants during the final stages of the regulatory approval process for Mr. Diamond's promotion to CEO. In the note Mr. Sants said that Mr. Diamond had not reached "the level of openness, transparency and willingness to air issues with the FSA" of his predecessor. Mr. Agius agreed and said that the outgoing Barclays CEO John Varley would "coach" Mr. Diamond on the issue...During a meeting with lawmakers after Mr. Diamond's resignation, Mr. Agius said that the Libor issue had not been raised by the FSA when it vetted the CEO. U.K. FSA Warned Barclays Over Diamond in 2010 [WSJ]