The Ballad of Roomy Khan

Life is terribly unfair. You help bring down Raj Rajaratnam and get yelled at by a defense lawyer during another insider-trading trial, but you tell a few white lies, destroy some evidence, warn some of your friends—including the only fugitive in the whole insider-trading crackdown—that the Feds are on to them and perjure yourself a little, and you don't get to get away with your second insider-trading conviction.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Life is terribly unfair. You help bring down Raj Rajaratnam and get yelled at by a defense lawyer during another insider-trading trial, but you tell a few white lies, destroy some evidence, warn some of your friends—including the only fugitive in the whole insider-trading crackdown—that the Feds are on to them and perjure yourself a little, and you don't get to get away with your second insider-trading conviction.

Such is the tough lesson learned by the useful if unreliable Roomy Khan yesterday, who was sent to the pokey for a year yesterday. While she's agreed not to appeal, she and her lawyer really think she's suffered enough.

“I understand the judge’s reasoning and logic,” Mr. German said. “But considering the individuals who went to trial got two years, I think one year for Ms. Khan is a lot.”

“I’ve lost all my money, and my education is rendered useless,” Ms. Khan said. “I have been ostracized by most of my family and friends, and I lead my life as a pariah in isolation."

Meanwhile, another cooperating witness—albeit one who didn't lie quite so much—got off with probation and time served yesterday, which must make Khan's sentence doubly upsetting.

Roomy Khan, Figure in Galleon Insider Case, Sentenced to One Year in Prison [DealBook]
Khan Gets One Year in Prison in Insider Trading Case [Bloomberg]
Teary Khan to prison [N.Y. Post]
Ex-Barai Analyst Sentenced to Probation [FINalternatives]

Related

Accused Insider Trader Doug Whitman Made A Halfhearted Attempt At The Faux Sympathy Route In Pumping Depressed Informant For Inside Information

Shortly before losing his patience and wondering aloud what the hell she was good for if not bringing him hot tips. FBI informant Roomy Khan, 53, told jury that she gleaned illegal tips on Polycom’s earnings from Sunil Bhalla, a former Polycom exec who was placed on leave in 2009. She then passed those tips to Whitman [Capital founder Doug Whitman] and a handful of other hedgie pals, including convicted Galleon Group co-founder Raj Rajaratnam and her bosses at Trivium Capital Management...“You know what would make you feel better?” Whitman asked Khan when she started complaining about her lot in life. “Calling Sunil and getting a good call on Polycom and being able to short it.” “Yeah, but I could go to jail for doing that, too,” Khan said. “You’re not going to be a slimeball, what do I want to talk to you for,” Whitman said. Roomy Not Slimy [NYP]

Letter Reveals More Names in Galleon Case

Roomy Khan, one of the key cooperating witnesses in the Galleon insider trading case, used her extensive rolodex of insiders to gain access to secret market-moving information. Recently released court documents show that list of contacts could be longer than we thought.

Rajat Gupta's Lawyers May Try The "Everybody Was Doing It" Defense

There is much to like in this morning's Journal article about the Rajat Gupta insider trading prosecution, including a nice illustration of how the inside information that Gupta allegedly passed to Raj Rajaratnam actually seems to have been out in the market already. But let's start with the transcript of the call between Raj Rajaratnam and his trader Ian Horowitz, which the Journal has redacted not for confidentiality but for saltiness: Just so you can see Raj Rajaratnam saying "fuck" a lot, the full transcript of that call is here. But, anyway, the Journal story:

Ex-SAC Analyst Spared Prison, Still Faces The Wrath of Cohen

Take note, insider-traders and those who might be accused of it in spite of their innocence: If you wear a wire and you don't have to go to jail. Wesley Wang, the former SAC analyst who helped convict one former boss and is probably helping to build cases against his bosses at SAC and Trellus Management, will get to keep doing so from the comfort of his northern California home.

David Einhorn Said No To A Capital Raise, Kept The Door Open For A Pub Crawl

Remember how David Einhorn got in trouble in England for insider trading on Punch Taverns stock and he was all "what?" and we were all "what?"? Well, you can judge it for yourself because now the entire disputed call with Punch is available online (at the back of this). So go read it, or read the highlights here. The FSA still thinks it's insider trading, but the count of people confused by the whole thing is rising, and now includes the Merrill banker on the call. There's lots of insider traderiness on this side of the pond today too so we should talk about that in a bit. For now, though, two other things. One is quick - no one can resist one part of the call and I can't either so here it is: DAVID EINHORN: Hi, I’m sorry I didn’t get to see you when you were in New York. PUNCH CEO: No, no, we -- well, we’ve -- we’ve only had the chance to speak once, although we have seen [reference to Greenlight Analyst] a few times since then. DAVID EINHORN: Oh, you’re -- you’re -- you’re getting more than -- than I could help with anyway. So, this is good. PUNCH CEO: Okay. That’s fair enough. Well, one day we’ll get you around on a pub crawl around some English pubs. DAVID EINHORN: Oh, that sounds fun. PUNCH CEO: It is. You’re right. English readers: Is it? I just assumed that Punch Taverns are rather grim places, like TGI Friday's but with more ... punching? ... but maybe I'm totally off base here. Also, here is a hypothesis: vice investments do well because, for the same level of profitability, they get more analyst/investor coverage and enthusiasm. Wouldn't you rather go on a pub crawl instead of like a tour of an auto parts factory in Queens? Would that influence your stock recommendations / money allocations? Someone should do a study.