Carl Levin Does Not Think Much Of Jamie Dimon

And Joe Nocera loves him for it.
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And Joe Nocera loves him for it.

Months earlier, the Senate Banking Committee, whose members lean on the big banks for major campaign contributions, held its own inquiry into the disastrous trades. There, JPMorgan’s chief executive, Jamie Dimon, was treated more like a visiting dignitary than a committee witness. Senator Charles Schumer of New York, unctuously describing Dimon as “a financial expert,” asked him to gauge the “danger of this kind of thing happening at other institutions not as well-capitalized as JPMorgan.��� Pathetic.

Levin and John McCain, the permanent subcommittee’s ranking minority member, didn’t even bother to invite Dimon. “We wanted to speak to the people who had the most information,” Levin told me. Thus, the subcommittee’s witnesses included Ina Drew, who led the division that oversaw the London traders, and Douglas Braunstein, who was the bank’s chief financial officer. The combination of Levin’s tough questions and a 300-page report by the subcommittee’s investigators was brutal. The bank, and Dimon, took a major reputational hit.

The Senate's Muckraker [NYT]

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Jamie Dimon (Sort Of) Returns Tom Brady's Favor

Back in October, the most wonderful aspect of the JPMorgan Whale Tale emerged in the pages of Vanity Fair: the day Vice-Chairman Jimmy Lee barricaded himself in his office determined to come up with a way to help Jamie Dimon, and after hours of thinking real hard, summoned his six secretaries and told them they had a job to do, which was getting Tom Brady on the horn so he could deliver a pep talk sure to cheer up the boss. Was the call kind of awkward, considering the two had never spoken and Brady's lack of useful investment ideas likely meant his big speech involved not much more than  "Even Super Bowl champion quarterbacks have bad days" and "Keep your chin up out there?" Probably. And yet some sort of bond was clearly forged, which would explain why Dimon felt compelled to throw Brady this bone: