Fake Hedge Fund Manager Who Ripped Off Kim Kardashian's Fake Husband Sentenced To A Few Years In Prison

Remember Andrey Hicks?
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Remember Andrey Hicks? For those who can't keep their founders of fake hedge funds straight, he's the guy who ripped off Kim Kardashian's 72 day husband, Chris Humphries, along with a bunch of other investors in his Locust Offshore Management fund, and in 2011 was arrested and had his assets frozen by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which took issue with the "brazen web of lies" he'd fed people that included:

  • The claim he received a Ph.D in Applied Mathematics from Harvard in two years (he neither earned his doctorate from Harvard nor his undergraduate degree and in fact only lasted three semesters in Cambridge, taking a single math course, in which he got a D-).
  • The claim that while working at Barclays Capital, he increased his group’s assets under management to $16 billion, despite BarCap having no record of his employment.
  • The claim that at Locust, he applied “quantitative strategies based on mathematical models he developed at Harvard”
  • The claim that Ernst & Young was the fund’s auditor, Credit Suisse its prime broker and custodian, even though the SEC report was the first either had heard of the guy.

Anyway, he's going to do some time.

U.S. Federal Judge Patti Saris sentenced Hicks, 29, who most recently lived in Massachusetts, to serve 40 months in prison and ordered him to pay $2.3 million in restitution...The money Hicks raised from wealthy clients including National Basketball Association player Kris Humphries, who was briefly married to reality television star Kim Kardashian, was used to pay for personal expenses, according to prosecutors. Hicks fabricated a trumped up investing record at his fake fund, Locust Offshore Management, telling clients that he earned an 80 percent trading profit in 2011. The average hedge fund that year lost about 5 percent. A year ago, under the civil case, a U.S. judge ordered Hicks to pay back more than $7.5 million, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said.

Judge orders fake fund manager Hicks to prison for 40 months [Reuters]

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Guy Who Ripped Off, Lied To Kim Kardashian's 72 Day Husband Pleads Guilty

Remember Andrey Hicks? To recap, he's the guy who was arrested last year (trying to make a run for Switzerland) and had his assets frozen by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which took issue with the fact that, in addition to stealing a couple million from investors in his Locust Offshore Management fund, he'd fed them a "brazen web of lies" that included: the claim he received a Ph.D in Applied Mathematics from Harvard in two years (he neither earned his doctorate from Harvard nor his undergraduate degree and in fact only lasted three semesters in Cambridge, taking a single math course, in which he got a D-); the claim that while working at Barclays Capital, he increased his group's assets under management to $16 billion, despite BarCap having no record of his employment; the claim that at Locust, he applied "quantitative strategies based on mathematical models he developed at Harvard"; the claim that Ernst & Young was the fund's auditor, Credit Suisse its prime broker and custodian, even though the SEC report was the first either had heard of the guy. Anyway, he's probably going to spend some time in jail.

Hedge Fund Manager Who Faked His Own Death Has A Few Theories About Other Famous Murders, Real And Imaginary

Remember Samuel Israel III? For those with short memories, SI3 is a former hedge fund manager who faked his own death in June 2008 with the help of his girlfriend, Debra Ryan, who later wrote an article explaining her actions by noting that she and Israel had "a blazing sex life" that was hard to walk away from (Ryan shared colorful anecdotes that included all the times Israel would "[jokingly] sneak up on her, once while wearing sunglasses on his penis"). For Israel's part, he had pretended to kill himself, incorporating a line from M*A*S*H into his fake suicide note, in an attempt to avoid the prison stay that was coming his way, on account of having taken Bayou Group investors for more than $450 million. At the time, he became something of a minor celebrity, whose business card, prominently featuring an egret, was auctioned off on eBay but since ultimately being sentenced to twenty years behind bars we'd heard nary a peep from the guy. Luckily, Andrew Ross Sorkin recently flew down to Butner, North Carolina for a little chat and it's a good thing he did because Israel had a lot he wanted to get off his chest. After offering ARS an "orange Life Saver," discussing his own version of a playoffs beard ("Mr. Israel...was wearing a tan prison uniform with his hair grown out, a mass of silver and brown curls sprouting from the sides of his bald head. 'I’m never going to cut it until I get out,' he exclaimed"), and talking Ponzi schemes, SI3 got down to the real matter at hand. About halfway through, the interview turned bizarre when Mr. Israel, on the verge of crying, announced: “I took a man’s life. I shot him twice.” I asked for more details. The story is recounted in “Octopus,” but the author, Mr. Lawson, doesn’t appear to believe it. In the supposed slaying, Mr. Israel describes himself defending a known con man, Robert Booth Nichols, who claimed to have once worked for the Central Intelligence Agency and has since died. Mr. Nichols was undertaking a secret trade at a German bank and was ambushed outside by a cockeyed “Middle Eastern guy.” Mr. Israel says he shot the ambusher in the hip and then in the head. He looked at me, shaking, and said, “I’ve seen someone with their head blown off maybe two feet back — as close as I am to you.” Mr. Israel recognized my skepticism. When I asked him what happened to the body, he said, “Bob made a couple of calls.” Again, I looked at him quizzically. “These people can do anything. They can get rid of a body,” he said. “Come on,” he added, looking at me as if I didn’t understand. “They can kill presidents.” I wasn’t sure what he was talking about. “The J.F.K. thing,” he said. He went on to tell me that he had videotapes of Kennedy’s assassination and that one was stolen by the F.B.I. “I know it makes me look like a crackpot,” he said. “But I know it’s real. Look into my eyes — I don’t care if people think I’m crazy.” Egrets. A Con Man Who Lives Between Truth And Fiction [Dealbook]