Let’s Exchange Heated Words Over: Business School Rankings

US News has regaled us with its annual ranking of the top business schools. I know you need a safe space to get huffy about perceived slights (be it your MBA program being lower than you believe is accurate or by having to suffer the indignity of an inferior institution being too close on the list), so let it out here and now.
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US News has regaled us with its annual ranking of the top business schools. I know you need a safe space to get huffy about perceived slights (be it your MBA program being lower than you believe is accurate or by having to suffer the indignity of an inferior institution being too close on the list), so let it out here and now.

104. West Virginia University
[...]
25. Georgetown University (McDonough)
24. University of Washington (Foster)
23. University of Minnesota‒Twin Cities (Carlson)
22. Indiana University‒Bloomington (Kelley)
21. Washington University in St. Louis (Olin)
20. University of North Carolina‒Chapel Hill (Kenan-Flagler)
19. Carnegie Mellon University (Tepper)
18. Emory University (Goizueta)
17. University of Texas‒Austin (McCombs)
16. Cornell University (Johnson)
15. University of Michigan‒Ann Arbor (Ross)
14. University of California‒Los Angeles (Anderson)
13. Yale
12. University of Virginia (Darden)
11. Duke University (Fuqua)
10. New York University (Stern)
9. Dartmouth College (Tuck)
8. Columbia
7. University of California‒Berkeley (Haas)
6. University of Chicago (Booth)
4. Northwestern University (Kellogg)
4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan)
3. University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)
1. Stanford
1. Harvard

Best Business Schools [US News]

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Business School Applicants Having None Of This "Show Us You Can Speak Without Paying A Consultant $500 To Show You How" Crap

After years of receiving scripted answers to questions from would-be business school students re: why they want to go to Harvard/Wharton/Stanford/Sloan or what they think of a company's earnings potential or where they see themselves in five to ten years or what they ate for breakfast, admissions officers have lately been taking a new tack in an attempt to see the "real" side of applicants. Hoping to get a little "unrehearsed honesty" and insight into who these people really are, prospective students are being asked to submit "reflections" ("a short, off-the-cut note that must be submitted within 24 hours of an admissions interview") and take part in "team-based discussions," for which they're told to "relax, be genuine," not worry about giving the "right" answer, and just say what they really think, rather than what a coach told them to say they think. Unfortunately, Harvard and Wharton officials apparently have no idea who they're dealing with here. You can't make future b-school students relax and be genuine! You can't! You won't!