SAC President: Don't Start Planning The Celebratory Zamboni Ride Through Downtown Stamford Just Yet

Author:
Publish date:

SAC Capital Advisors LP executives told investors Monday that its settlements with securities regulators, in which the hedge-fund firm agreed to pay a record $616 million penalty to end two insider-trading cases, was a difficult decision that will help it move forward. On a conference call with clients, SAC President Tom Conheeney cautioned that the two agreements with the Securities and Exchange Commission wouldn't mark the end of the regulatory scrutiny that has shrouded the firm in recent years. The settlements, Mr. Conheeney said on the call, are "an important first step." But, he added, "I don't want to leave you with the thought that this means everything is cleared up." [WSJ, earlier]

Related

Doctor Who Tipped Off SAC Manager Wasn't Conspicuous About His Wealth Except When He Was Telling Strangers On Planes About All The Fancy Hotels And Limo Rides Insider Trading Afforded Him

As you may have heard, in addition to the salary he was paid by the University of Michigan, Dr. Sidney Gilman made about $100,000/year through his side-gig advising "a wide network of Wall Street traders."  That network included included Mathew Martoma, recently charged with running “the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever,” based on the information he received from Gilman, who made it a habit of leaking highly confidential information to the former SAC Capital employee. While most people that engage in fraud can't help but spend their ill-gotten gains in a flashy way that attracts unwanted attention (expensive cars, private jets, chinchilla fur coats) the Times reports that Sid Gilman's supplementary income "was not readily apparent in his lifestyle in Michigan." For instance, no second home and no bragging to his colleagues about his life on Wall Street. Still, on at least one occasion, the doctor couldn't help but let the underage girl sitting next to him on a flight home know that she was in the presence of a BSD.

Things Could Be A LOT Better At SAC Capital Right Now

Back in October, we detailed a list of things that, if you are the hedge fund manager who goes by the name Steven A. Cohen, you really don't want to hear first thing in the morning. They included: “The fleeces are on back order”; “Your ex-wife is in the lobby”; “There’s a photographer here who said he’s been authorized to shoot you wearing a king’s robe and crown for a set of playing cards”; “You’ve been outmaneuvered for the Toledo Mud Hens. But I hear the Binghamton Mets may be available.” Today we must update that list to include another thing, perhaps THE thing,* that people delivering news to Cohen don't want to relay. Paraphrasing but any variants on: "Mr. Cohen, we've received a Wells notice and by the way, they're considering naming you personally."