Bloomberg: New Clientele Leads To Changes In Decor, Need For Updated Yelp Reviews At Tokyo Bar - Dealbreaker

Bloomberg: New Clientele Leads To Changes In Decor, Need For Updated Yelp Reviews At Tokyo Bar

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With fewer bankers and more patrons from the tech world, the atmosphere has become more laid back, Shioya said. After business declined following the financial crisis, Heartland began showing sporting events on its big-screen display to draw customers. Couches where well-dressed men and mini-skirted women once paired up to lounge and drink cocktails were replaced with tables and stools. “The bankers were often drinking with ladies who came here to meet foreign businessmen, who were looking to marry a wealthy banker and go overseas,” Shioya said, adding that now the women who come tend to be office workers looking to practice English. [Bloomberg]

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