John Paulson Does Not Have To Defend Himself To You, Hugh

Remember Paulson & Co's investment in Sino-Forest? One of the less than stellar trades that helped contribute to 2011 being an annus fucking horribilis for the hedge fund? Got a former investor named Hugh F. Culverhouse all riled up, shouting about "gross negligence" and "failure to properly monitor" the situation and making claims that it was clear no one at P&C bothered to perform any due diligence on the company, because if they did, "the Paulson companies could...have foreseen Sino-Forest's problems?" Things actually worked out for JP&Co on this one.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Remember Paulson & Co's investment in Sino-Forest? One of the less than stellar trades that helped contribute to 2011 being an annus fucking horribilis for the hedge fund? Got a former investor named Hugh F. Culverhouse all riled up, shouting about "gross negligence" and "failure to properly monitor" the situation and making claims that it was clear no one at P&C bothered to perform any due diligence on the company, because if they did, "the Paulson companies could...have foreseen Sino-Forest's problems?" Things actually worked out for JP&Co on this one.

A federal judge in Miami threw out a lawsuit that accused Paulson & Co. of shoddy due diligence on Chinese forestry company Sino-Forest Corp., which saw its share price tumble after being attacked by a short seller...The plaintiff in the suit, Hugh F. Culverhouse, is a former federal prosecutor and Miami-based investor whose family once owned the Tampa Bay Buccaneers football team. Mr. Culverhouse alleged that Paulson & Co. "acted in a grossly negligent manner," including by failing to comply with the firm's "own rules and standards of conduct and supervision," according to the suit. In a motion to dismiss the suit, Paulson & Co. said Mr. Culverhouse had no legal standing to sue because he was an investor in a Paulson hedge fund through a Citigroup feeder fund. The docket note said the judge granted the motion by the hedge-fund firm to dismiss the case "on grounds that Plaintiff lacks standing to bring the instant litigation and claim a fiduciary relationship with Defendants."

Paulson Wins Court Dismissal of Lawsuit [WSJ]

Related

All John Paulson Does Is Win

Starting today! Every day before it (not including 2007-2009) shall never be spoken of again! Don't even entertain the thought of uttering '2010-2012,' in his presence or otherwise! Don't say it, don't even think it! Someone run out and get some holy water because this is nothing short of a rebirth! Today is the first day of the rest of his life!

Paulson and Co Investor Finds New And Interesting Way To Kick John Paulson When He's Down

As Paulson and Co employees, clients, and people named John Paulson do not need to be told, the past year and half has not been the most joyous of times for the hedge fund giant. After making billions shorting subprime mortgages, the firm ended 2011 down 55 percent, was down 16 percent through the first half of 2012, and as of July, saw assets under management decline 44.9 percent to $21 billion from $38.1 billion, due to a combination of unfortunate performance and redemptions by investors so angry at the fund that they've felt the need to repeatedly tell anyone who will listen that parting ways with P&C was among the best if not the best decision they've ever made. One investor that hasn't had to consider voicing its unhappiness to the press or even worry about losing money at all? The 92nd Street Y. Last November Paulson guaranteed that he would personally cover their losses, whatever they turned out to be, come year-end. And the generosity did not stop there: for this one investor only, Paulson offered his services pro-bono, waiving all fees. So while he probably didn't expect representatives of the Y to rent a skywriting plane to proclaim their love and appreciation for him over midtown, lobby the city of New York to get 92nd renamed Paulson Street, or have his face tattooed to their chests, he probably also figured they wouldn't turn around and hit him the mother of all slaps in the face. In this case the declaration that despite the highly favorable terms of their arrangement, any involvement with P&C still felt a tad too risky for everyone's comfort level. In the midst of the financial crisis, the 92nd Street Y came up with a sweetheart deal for its endowment: investments in funds run by the likes of John Paulson, Marc Lasry, and other hedge-fund luminaries that were fee-free and guaranteed against losses. The strategy performed well for several years, said people familiar with how it worked, as the Y benefited from risk-free investing in some of the fund industry’s most successful strategies. But, concerned about the impact of a catastrophe in which a money manager couldn’t repay losses and eager to construct a more diversified portfolio, the Y recently opted to redeem its hedge-fund investments, these people said, and rebuild its financial strategy from scratch. Paulson himself is worth $15 billion, so a catastrophe in which he couldn't repay the Y's losses would have to be a big one. And don't give him some line about how you're pulling out of all hedge fund investments and it's not personal. You could have let him have this. Despite Sweet Deal, 92nd Street Y Redeems Paulson Money [CNBC] Earlier: John Paulson: I’ll Get The Losses This Year, Next Year We Go Dutch?

He's Too Modest To Ask, But "John Paulson's Bethesda Fountain" Does Have A Nice Ring To It

As does "John Paulson's Central Park." Or simply: "Paulson Park." Or, at the very least, some kind of life-size bronze statue, possibly inspired by his most famous photo-shoot. He'd never explicitly ask for it, so let's make something happen. 1) Because he's been really quite generous and 2) This year's been tough. We all need our pick-me-ups. At a news conference at Bethesda Fountain in Central Park on Tuesday morning, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and the Central Park Conservancy announced that John A. Paulson, the hedge fund billionaire, along with the Paulson Family Foundation were giving $100 million to the Central Park Conservancy. It is believed to be the largest gift ever to a public park, more than doubling the $40 million given this year to build a cycling track in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Mr. Paulson, a lifelong New Yorker, said that as an infant he was pushed around in a baby carriage in the park and that he later remembered going to Bethesda Fountain as a teenager and seeing it covered in graffiti, with no water flowing. When asked at the news conference what prompted the gift, Mr. Paulson said: “Walking through the park in different seasons, it kept coming back that in my mind Central Park is the most deserving of all of New York’s cultural institutions. And I wanted the amount to make a difference. The park is very large, and its endowment is relatively small.” The park’s current endowment stands at $144 million. Half of Mr. Paulson’s gift will go to the endowment, while the other half will be used for capital improvements. Mr. Paulson mentioned two that he considered important: Restoring the park’s North Woods, and sprucing up the Merchant’s Gate entrance at the park’s southwest corner, the most heavily used entrance. Hedge Fund Manager Donates $100 Million For Central Park [NYT]

Bonus Watch '13: Paulson And Co.

The bad news: even if Paulson and Co. turns things around in 2012, they might not get to collect performance fees, on account of being under water due to last year's annus fucking horribilis. The good news: John Paulson's employee will still get paid, because that's just the kind of guy he is. Paulson’s flagship fund, Advantage Plus, fell a whopping 53 percent last year – prompting an apology to investors and a media drubbing. The decline also meant that it could be years before Advantage Plus and other fallen Paulson funds are able to return to their high-water mark, or the returns level at which John Paulson and his colleagues can begin to collect a significant percentage of their annual gains as performance fees. In an acknowledgement of that problem, Paulson recently told some employees he would reset the firm’s internal high-water mark to zero as of Jan. 1, said the person familiar with the matter, effectively meaning that if the company’s funds are in the black for 2012, those employees can collect bonuses pegged to this year’s returns and not be dragged down by last year’s losses. Paulson will pay for those bonuses himself, this person added. John Paulson Lowers the Bar to Pay Employees [CNBC] Related: John Paulson: I’ll Get The Losses This Year, Next Year We Go Dutch?