'Scantily Clad' Shoeshine Girls At New FiDi Outfit May Look Like Hooters Waitresses But They Know Their Shit

If there was one thing you could change about your regular shoe shine guy, would it be how he looks in a pair of shorts and a tank top? Is the only thing holding you back from taking your leather elsewhere the assumption that you can either go to a shiner who knows his way around shoe or you can go to someone who's easy on the eyes, but you can't go to both? Then prepare to have your world rocked. Not does the staff of Shoe Shine NYC, a new venture started by a father and son team, show up for work in the above attire, but they've apparently all met the credit hour requirements and passed the series of exams necessaryto receive their certificates in shoe shinery.
Author:
Publish date:
Updated on

If there was one thing you could change about your regular shoe shine guy, would it be how he looks in a pair of shorts and a tank top? Is the only thing holding you back from taking your leather elsewhere the assumption that you can either go to a shiner who knows his way around a shoe or you can go to someone who's easy on the eyes, but you can't go to both? Then prepare to have your world rocked.

Not does the staff of Shoe Shine NYC, a new venture started by a father and son team, show up for work in the above attire, but they've apparently all met the credit hour requirements and passed the series of exams necessary to receive their certificates in shoe shinery.

Like the Hooters of the shoe-shine world, Star Shine NYC, at 40 New St., employs beautiful, young, scantily clad women to offer a professional service — with a view. Co-owner Kevin White Jr., 30, said he and his dad, who both live in Queens and work in finance, had bounced around the idea of an upscale shoe-shine spot run by attractive women for some time, and finally decided to make the move. “We thought it could be a successful twist,” said White, who opened the store three weeks ago. “Finance guys are so busy and stressed, this is a chance to unwind and relax. It’s definitely an upgraded shoe-shine experience.” Despite the little black shorts and tight tank tops sported by all the female employees, White said the store, which features large leather chairs and flat-screen TVs, is meant to have a classy atmosphere. White also hopes to start serving beer and wine in the store in the next couple of months. “All the young ladies have undergone professional training — this is an upscale place,” White said.

Scantily Clad Ladies Spice Up Shoe Shines at New Financial District Shop [DNAI]

Related

Lloyd Blankfein Finally Gets To Be The Prettiest Girl At The Ball

Time was, Jamie Dimon was the most popular CEO on Wall Street and America's "Least Hated Banker," for reasons that included the fact that the man has soulful blue eyes, charisma out the ass, and was in charge of one of the banks that a) didn't go out of business during the financial crisis, like Lehman and Bear and b) supposedly didn't actually need the bailout money the government made it take (as JD has said previously), like Bank of America and Citigroup. The man, in the hearts of many and especially the adoring press, could do no wrong. Which is why it probably stung a lot that Lloyd Blankfein, a Wall Street CEO who also possesses more charm than a person would know what do do with, who was also in charge of a bank that neither went out of business during the financial crisis nor required the bailout money it was forced to take (according to GS), and who is also the owner of a pair of baby blues, though in his case ones that sparkle, could only do wrong. And while LB is not one to gloat at another's misfortune, especially that of a friend, he's obviously feeling pretty good about being living proof of the old saying, "only one Wall Street CEO's balls can be in a vise at a time," and right now it's JD's turn. Dimon did not attend the annual Robin Hood Foundation party [last night], but Blankfein was there, enjoying a rare night out of the spotlight. He shook hands, introduced his wife and, grinning broadly, posed for pictures. For months, Goldman Sachs has been portrayed as the callous Wall Street behemoth whose executives collected giant bonuses while America's housing crisis worsened and unemployment rose. But Monday night was different. "No one cares about Lloyd tonight. It is Jamie against the world, and that's got to feel good for Lloyd," another hedge fund manager said. And this is just the beginning. First, they stop calling you Satan and claiming you poisoned their food, next glowing profiles and cover stories devoting major column inches to your rippling biceps and the throngs of women you beat off with a stick. Dimon Pushes Blankfein Off Hot Seat At Charity Gala [Reuters] Robin Hood Scene: Blankfein, Soros, Rihanna [Bloomberg/Photo]

Greg Smith: Goldman Sachs Interns Taught Harsh But Important Lessons By Demanding But Affable Managing Directors

Lesson 1, according the first chapter of Why I Left Goldman Sachs to leak online: the difference between a sandwich and a salad. You needed to be very entrepreneurial and creative. Adding value as an intern often began with getting coffee for the desk every day; frequently, interns also did breakfast and lunch runs. You would literally take a pen and pad and go around to the ten or fifteen people on the desk and take everyone's order. It's a strange concept, but Wall Street looks at attention to detail as an indicator of how people are going to do in their job. If a kid keeps messing up the lunch order, he's probably going to mess up something else down the line. I remember one managing director-- a few years after I'd started working at the firm-- who was very sensitive about his lunch orders. He didn't eat onion or certain other things. One day he asked an intern for a cheddar cheese sandwich, and the kid came back with a cheddar cheese salad. The kid handed it to him so proudly: "Here's your cheddar cheese salad." I was sitting next to the MD, so I remember the incident well. He opened the container, looked at the salad, looked up at the kid, closed the container, and threw it in the trash. It was a bit harsh, but it was also a teaching moment. The managing director joked about it with the kid afterward; he didn't make a big deal about it. The lesson was learned. Chapter 1: "I Don't Know, But I'll Find Out" [PDF] Earlier: What Else Does Goldman Sachs Have In Store For Greg Smith?; Goldman Sachs Unimpressed By Sophomoric Writing Efforts Of Former Employee; Resignation Letter Reveals Goldman Sachs Is In The Business Of Making Money, Hires People Who Don’t Know How To Tie Their Shoes; Jewish Ping-Pong Tournament Participant / Sixth-Year Goldman Sachs Vice President Is Looking For His Next Challenge; Goldman Sachs Accuser Greg Smith (Might Have) Lied About That Which He Holds Most Sacred