Getting To The Bottom Of FedMinutesGate

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Someone who shouldn't have had access sent the minutes to someone who didn't have accessand who didn't have a calendar or something. The rest is history.

While the Fed's own information-security policies restricted access to the minutes before publication to those with a "strict need to know," in fact practices were far less careful, the audit found.

A public-affairs assistant got the minutes from the Fed's internal publication system after receiving an email that the minutes were ready, the report said. A Fed spokesman declined to name the assistant.

The assistant emailed a copy of the minutes to a staffer in the congressional liaison's office, who didn't have permission to access the internal publication system, according to the report. While he wasn't named in the report, the Journal had previously identified the staffer in the Fed's congressional office as Brian Gross.

The congressional office staffer emailed the minutes to a distribution list of names maintained by the congressional liaison's office. The staffer told investigators that "he was confused about the date," leading him to send the minutes a day early.

Fed Staff Violated Bank's Rules in Early Minutes Release [WSJ]

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