Goldman Sachs Hopeful Differentiating Himself Outside 200 West With Coffee, Donuts, Hot Chicks

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Michael Penn has vowed to stay put until someone makes him an offer.

When life gives you a lemon, you make lemonade — or coffee, depending on the time of day. That’s what Michael Penn, 23, is doing to land a career in banking. The Fordham graduate student has opened up a beverage and donut stand outside Goldman Sachs’ HQ downtown to get his name and résumé in front of the managers at the white-shoe firm. But Penn doesn’t want 25 cents for a drink or treat — he wants a job. And showing that he knows his target audience, Penn brings along several female friends to hand out his credentials to passersby. “Sex sells. I needed attraction to draw them to the coffee and lemonade,” he says. “It’s an unconventional investment in my job hunt. My unique form of networking. This reflects my true character and is the way I differentiate myself.” [...] Penn says he plans to continue his promotion outside the bank until he lands a job.

On the one hand, we like this kid's panache and willingness to put himself out there. On the other, he's offering Goldman Sachs hiring managers quite the Sophie's Choice: they don't give him a job, they lose out on a promising candidate. They do give him a job, they lose out on free donuts.

Fordham grad’s ‘social’ hiring campaign [NYP]

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A week ago today, a man named Greg Smith resigned from Goldman Sachs. As a sort of exit interview, Smith explained his reasons for departing the firm in a New York Times Op-Ed entitled "Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs." The equity derivatives VP wrote that Goldman had "veered so far from the place I joined right out of college that I can no longer in good conscience say I identify with what it stands for." Smith went on to note that whereas the Goldman of today is "just about making money," the Goldman he knew as a young pup "revolved around teamwork, integrity, a spirit of humility, and always doing right by our clients." It was a culture that made him "love working for the firm" and its absence had stripped him of "pride and belief" he once held in the place. While claiming that Goldman Sachs has become virtually unrecognizable from the institution founded by Marcus (Goldman) and Samuel (Sachs), which put clients ahead of its own interests, is hardly a new argument, there was something about Smith's words that gave readers a moment's pause. He was so deeply distraught over the differences between the Goldman of 2012 and the Goldman of 2000 (when he was hired) that suggested...more. That he'd seen things. Things that had made an imprint on his soul. Things that he couldn't forget. Things that he held up in his heart for how Goldman should be and things that made it all the more difficult to ignore when it failed to live up to that ideal. Things like this: