But Daaad! Netflix Has So Much More Growth Potential!

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As you may have heard, starting October 10, Carl Icahn sold 2.99 million shares of Netflix. His son Brett, who works for the old man, thought this was a mistake. So that no one felt like their voice wasn't being heard, a filing disclosing the sale included statements by both parties, "exposing [the] disagreement" between Senior and Junior. Brett's lays out his investment thesis. Carl's, which reads like he addressed it to Brett and then changed it to "Dear SEC", is essentially:

"Listen up, Sonny Boy. I know you think you've learned a thing or two and that's great. But step aside, Big Daddy's got money to make."

Icahn sold 2.99 million shares of Los Gatos, California-based Netflix starting on Oct. 10, as it approached new highs, according to a regulatory filing yesterday. He continues to own 2.67 million shares, or a 4.5 percent stake. The investor and his son outlined their differences in a statement. Icahn said the decision to sell was his, and it was time to collect profit, while Brett Icahn and fund co-manager David Schechter argued Netflix still has significant growth potential. The pair rewrote their contracts so the performance fee they receive from Carl Icahn will reflect any subsequent gains or losses on the Netflix shares sold at his direction. Icahn, 77, said his cost was about $58 a share, suggesting a gain of almost $800 million from the transactions. “As a hardened veteran of seven bear markets I have learned that when you are lucky and/or smart enough to have made a total return of 457 percent in only 14 months it is time to take some of the chips off the table,” Icahn said. He didn’t respond to a call for further comment.

Icahn’s Netflix Sale Shows Difference With Son Over Value [Bloomberg]

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Carl Icahn Gives Son Four Years To Prove Himself

Ten years ago, Carl Icahn hired his son Brett to be an analyst at Icahn Enterprises and the kid didn't fuck anything up so he got to keep his job. Two year ago, Carl gave Brett and another employee, David Schechter, $300 million to invest under the "Sargon portfolio," and the guys returned 96 percent (before fees) through June. Last month, Carl tossed the duo an additional $3 billion and a contract that expires in 2016, at which time Papa Icahn will either officially Brett a worthy successor or offer to serve as a reference for his next gig. Under a 46-page legal agreement filed with federal regulators last month, Brett Icahn and Schechter will get to invest their boss’s capital in companies with stock market values between $750 million and $10 billion. The deal may free the elder Icahn, who still has final say over many aspects of the portfolio, to focus on larger targets for shareholder activism. Brett, who turns 33 this month, along with Schechter has been running $300 million for his father, who owns more than 90 percent of Icahn Enterprises LP, a holding company with $24 billion in assets including activist investing partnerships as well as the Tropicana casinos, an oil refiner and an auto-parts maker. The arrangement expires after Carl turns 80 in 2016, giving Brett the chance to both prove his mettle as a successor and develop a track record to start his own hedge fund. After hiring Brett as an investment analyst a decade ago, Icahn allocated the $300 million to his son and Schechter in April 2010 to invest in loans and securities of companies with less than $2 billion in equity value. Their investments, internally dubbed the Sargon portfolio, generated a gross cumulative gain of 96 percent by the end of June, according to a July 27 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission...“These two guys doubled our money over the last two years,” the elder Icahn said in an interview. “You can’t complain about that.” Carl Icahn Hands Son Brett $3 Billion To Prove His Mettle [Bloomberg]