Deutsche Bank Warning To Employees Re: Not Joking About Market Manipulation Would've Been More Useful To Robert Wallden Yesterday!

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At the end of October, Deutsche Bank held a town hall on the topic of electronic communication, specifically the perils of making statements re: engaging in fraud, even in jest. To be safe, one should reserve such riffing for face-to-face conversations, or, to avoid headaches in the form of house calls from the FBI, insert some sort of disclaimer in the chat making clear that any talk of breaking the law is not to be taken seriously. Clearly, these are good tips that Deutsche employees will presumably employ moving forward. Unfortunately, they came a bit too late for trader Richard Whalen, who in retrospect would've appreciated hearing them before taking part in the "ill-advised" banter that led to this:

One morning this month, agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation showed up unannounced at the home of a New York-based currencies trader for Deutsche Bank. The agents showed him transcripts of an electronic chat in which the trader appeared to boast about trying to manipulate foreign-exchange markets, according to people familiar with the incident...People close to Deutsche Bank say the incident stemmed from a misunderstanding based at least partly on the trader having made a joke, in writing, about his ability to manipulate markets. Mr. Wallden remains a Deutsche Bank employee and hasn't been suspended, these people say...

At a town-hall meeting in Deutsche Bank's London offices Oct. 22, executives warned employees that things they write in electronic chat sessions that are intended to be light-hearted or jokes can look sinister if read out of context, according to someone at the meeting. Weeks later, when the FBI visited Mr. Wallden, he declined to comment to them about the contents of the chat transcript that the agents brought with them, according to the people familiar with the incident. In the chat, which took place around Christmas in a recent year, the trader made grandiose boasts about his ability to influence currencies markets, these people say. After the agents left his home, the trader called his managers at Deutsche Bank, these people say. The bank conducted a thorough but continuing review, which has so far found that the trader was making an ill-advised joke, these people say.

FBI Tries New Tactic in Currency Probe [WSJ]

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Deutsche Bank Executive Sought Counsel From Semi-Helpful LAPD Re: Bath Salts Prior To Ruthless Beating, Arrest

"How long does this stuff stay in your system?" After he was badly injured in May by two LAPD officers, top Deutsche Bank executive Brian C. Mulligan alleged that police manufactured a report that painted him as a snarling, thrashing man who told the officers that he'd recently ingested drugs known as "bath salts." But days before the May confrontation, Mulligan apparently told another officer in a different city a story similar to what appears in the LAPD report. He said he'd previously snorted "white lightning," a type of bath salts, a synthetic drug, and believed that a helicopter had been trailing him, according to a Glendale police recording of the conversation. "I know this is gonna sound crazy, but I feel like there are people following me. I feel like there was a chopper, do you hear a chopper?" Mulligan said on the recording, which was obtained by The Times. "We don't have a helicopter up in Glendale," the officer replied.Officials with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, which represents LAPD officers, said the recording undercuts Mulligan's version of his altercation with the LAPD officers, the subject of a $50-million claim he filed with the city, which is a precursor to a lawsuit...Mulligan alleged that the officers dragged him to a motel, threatened to kill him if he left and then, when they discovered he'd escaped, beat him so badly that he suffered 15 fractures to his nose and needed dozens of stitches. Mulligan said he felt "a little paranoid" during the sometimes-rambling, 11-minute exchange. He told the officer that he'd recently purchased some bath salts at local pot shops. Mulligan said he'd snorted bath salts at least 20 times but, as of that day, had not used any for roughly two weeks. "How long does this stuff stay in your...system, man, how's it legal!" he said on the recording...The officer described bath salts as "a close relative of methamphetamine" and encouraged him to see a doctor or drug counselor. "I mean, my wife knows," Mulligan said. "OK," the officer replied, "you need to get on top of this before it gets on top of you." ‘Paranoid’ bank exec told officer he used bath salts, police say [LA Times] Earlier: Deutsche Bank Managing Director, LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On Savage Beating “Incident”

Authorities Would Like To Add That Deutsche Bank Executive "Ruthlessly Beaten" By LAPD May Or May Not Have Been On "White Lightning" At The Time

A couple weeks back, Deutsche Bank vice chairman and managing director Brian Mulligan filed a claim with the city of Los Angeles, letting people know he intended to sue for $50 million over an incident that took place involving the LAPD, which left the media banker with “a broken shoulder blade and 15 nasal fractures.” According to Mulligan, police officers abducted him from a street corner, drove him to a motel, told him to wait there for a few hours, and then beat him so "ruthlessly" he "barely looked human" when they were done. According the LAPD, several calls had been placed about a man in the area "trying to break into cars" that fit Mulligan's description. They confronted the guy, who told them he was tired, which was why they drove him to the motel. He emerged hours later, started running through traffic, failed to heed their orders to get out of the street and assumed a "fighting stance," hence the need to deal with him in an aggressive fashion. At the time, a spokesman for the LA County DA’s office said that there are no plans to file criminal charges and that the office would simply like to “have a discussion" with Mulligan to advise him on "how best to follow the law so that incidents like this don’t occur again.” Also, it's possible he was experimenting with bath salts. The police report states that Mulligan was sweating profusely and walking with an unsteady gait when officers responded to reports that he was trying to break into cars in a Jack-in-the-Box parking lot. Mulligan told officers he was being chased and didn't know why. He also stated that he had ingested "white lightning" and marijuana and that he had not slept for four days. Brian Mulligan On Bath Salts: Deutsche Bank Executive Said He Was On 'White Lightning,' Police Say [HP] Earlier: Deutsche Bank Managing Director, LAPD Not Yet Seeing Eye To Eye On Savage Beating “Incident”