SAC Guilty Plea Gives Mets Early Off-Season Opportunity To Embarrass Themselves

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In case you had forgotten, Steve Cohen owns a small slice of the New York Mets. And like Bobby Bonilla, Mo Vaughn and Oliver Perez before him, the team may be stuck with Cohen, reports the Times.

“Generally speaking, people in these situations come forward and say to the company: ‘What do you want me to do? I don’t want to embarrass you. You’ve got plenty of troubles as it is.’ And many times, the individual will leave.”

That may not be so easy at Citi Field. The limited partners have agreed not to sell their shares for three years — or until around March 2015 — and to offer them to existing partners first. Given the debt-filled recent history of the Mets, it is unlikely that Wilpon has $20 million lying around to return to Cohen as the team seeks, in the weeks ahead, to sign some free agents with the money now coming off its payroll. Other minority partners, like the comedian Bill Maher, may not be willing to finance Cohen’s exit.

And if his stake were then offered to outside bidders, how many people these days want to invest tens of millions in the Mets?

The Mets' Delicate Dance With a Billionaire [NYT]

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New York Mets Might Want To Savor Their Time Under The Tutelage Of Steve Cohen

...because they're about their last! SAC Capital Advisors founder Steven Cohen is the front-runner to purchase the Los Angeles Dodgers. Reports earlier this week indicated that Cohen's bid for the baseball team was a couple hundred million dollars less than that made by former baseball executive Stan Kasten and Los Angeles Lakers legend Magic Johnson. But Cohen's bid now matches the Kasten-Johnson offer of $1.6 billion—and at least half of Cohen's purchase price would come in the form of cash. Indeed, Cohen, who last month bought a small stake in the New York Mets, which he would have to give up if approved to buy the California team, may already be planning for the Dodgers' future. He has reportedly spoken with former Major League manager Tony La Russa about taking the team over under a Cohen regime. [FinAlternatives]