You Are Now Once Again Free To Invade The Wall Street Bull's Personal Space

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The bull, who has been surrounded by barricades for nearly three years in order to keep him safe from Occupy Wall Street protesters, finally got the room to stretch out today when Police Commission Bill Bratton ordered his staff to remove the barriers. After keeping his fans at arms length for so long, the bull celebrated by allowing tourists and one "Wall Street veteran" to pat his head and rub him where the sun don't shine for good luck, and will presumably be mounted by someone before nightfall. [CBS via DI]

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