Company That Does Nothing Finds A Way To Plough Through $1.3 Billion

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Lightsquared, come on down.

Philip Falcone's LightSquared blew through another $55.4 million last month, bringing the company's total losses to $1.3 billion since it filed for bankruptcy two years ago. In a monthly operating report filed Thursday with U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan, LightSquared again attributed a bulk of the losses to interest payments on its debt. In April, those payments totaled $36.9 million, bringing the amount of interest paid to $788.2 million since the wireless venture's May 2012 Chapter 11 filing.

LightSquared Keeps Burning Cash [WSJ]

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Harbinger Capital-Backed LightSquared: What If We Told You We Could Build A Wireless Network That Doesn't Kill People Via GPS Interference? Does That Sound Like Something You'd Be Interested In?

As many of you know, the last year or so has been a pretty tough one for Phil Falcone. In addition to a civil suit against him by Harbinger Capital investors, DWAI's on the home front, and the pesky matter of being charged with securities fraud by the SEC, which would like to see him banned from the industry, what's really been plaguing him has been the opposition encountered by LightSquared, his dream and the thing he's more or less staked all his and his investors' money on. Before it entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy in May, the most serious charge against the company was that while it may seek to create "convenient connectivity for all," in doing so, the odds are high it would GPS interference that would result in boats getting lost at sea; "degrade precision services that track hurricanes, guide farmers, and help build flood defenses"; and, according to the FAA, "cost 794 lives in aviation accidents over 10 years with disruptions to satellite-aided navigation." Now, four months later, the would-be wireless network has come back with a plan: LightSquared, but without all the bad parts (for now). Philip Falcone's LightSquared on Friday made a proposal to the Federal Communications Commission that the company hopes will solve the regulatory issues surrounding its wireless satellite network and help it build its business faster without abandoning its long-term goals...LightSquared filed to modify its license application so it can use its five megahertz of spectrum that haven't caused GPS worries. It also seeks to use another five that it would share with federal-government users. The other filing, a rulemaking petition, calls for LightSquared to forego using the "upper" 10 MHz that have caused GPS concerns. In the meantime, it still wants the FCC to consider use of that 10 MHz but agreed to wait for and cooperate with "operating parameters and revised rules for terrestrial use of this spectrum." Don't get them wrong, they *want* to use the stuff that's possibly GSP harmful, but in the meantime will be happy to use the stuff that isn't, if that works for everyone. LightSquared Proposes Sharing Wireless Network With Government [DowJones]

Who Wants To Invest In Phil Falcone's New Company?

Harbinger Global Corp is coming to an exchange near you. Phil Falcone, the embattled billionaire hedge fund manager, has put together an unorthodox IPO that will see his hedge fund firm contribute assets valued at $350 million to a blank check company that will trade publicly. In the deal, a special purpose acquisition company that is expected to trade on Nasdaq and be known as Harbinger Global Corp., will acquire a majority interest in an MGM-branded hotel and casino development in Vietnam and a minority interest in an iron ore producer working in Brazil. Funds run by Falcone’s Harbinger Capital Management that are contributing the assets will get an ownership stake that could be as high as 96% in Harbinger Global and Falcone is slated to become executive chairman of the company. Falcone’s move to become closely involved in a publicly-traded company is audacious given that he is currently facing securities fraud charges from the Securities & Exchange Commission. Yeah, well, people also thought it was audacious for him to invite a burlesque dancing pig he barely knew to come and live with him and she turned out to be the best thing that ever happened to him, so.