Deutsche Bank Co-Investment Banking Chief Has Had It With You F*cking A**holes

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Vulgarities and indiscreet chatter have percolated through Wall Street’s trading floors and online chat rooms for many years, and might have stayed there were it not for a string of recent regulatory crackdowns. Now, thanks to investigations that have produced reams of internal communications among traders and brokers, a window has opened onto the predominantly male locker room culture of finance. Some banks — anxious to avoid further embarrassments — are taking steps to clean up that culture. “Some of you are falling way short of our established standards,” Colin Fan, the co-chief of the investment banking division at Deutsche Bank, the big German lender, said in a recent internal video, outlining a code of conduct that has echoes of the famous etiquette guidelines published nearly a century ago by Mrs. Post. “Let’s be clear,” Mr. Fan continued. “Our reputation is everything. Being boastful, indiscreet and vulgar is not O.K. It will have serious consequences for your career, and I have lost patience on this issue.” [Dealbook]

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