10 Reasons Wall Street Is Using Smart Drugs To Crush Work

Popularized in films like Limitless, legal smart drugs called Nootropics are becoming more and more prevalent in board rooms and on Wall Street.
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Popularized in films like Limitless, legal smart drugs called Nootropics are becoming more and more prevalent in board rooms and on Wall Street.

1. Wall Street Jobs Demand Excellence

As Wall Street jobs become more competitive and cutthroat- the most ambitious and talented are increasingly looking for anything that can give them an edge. Excellence is not a suggestion, its a requirement. With billions on the line, we always need to be performing at our best.

2. Neuropharmacology Has Improved Significantly. Safer, Cheaper, and More Effective Options

While NZT 48, the pill that transforms Bradley Cooper’s character’s life in the film “Limitless” is itself a creation of fiction, the world of neuropharmacology has spent the last 50 years searching for brain supplements and cognitive enhancers that may give you similar benefits. Called nootropics, they are used by a small but devoted class of individuals committed to building better brains.

3. Study Shows Ingredients Can Improve Test Scores By 8.4%

According to a recent study published in Phytomedicine Journal, subjects taking Rhodiola Rosea extract, a natural ingredient found in nootropics like Neurofuse, demonstrated an improvement of test scores after 20 days of supplementation when compared with the control placebo group.

4. Feel Better, It’s Science

Study drugs, aka nootropics, help boost your two “feel good” neurotransmitters, serotonin and dopamine. This makes you more pleasant to be around and helps you deal with stress, and in turn, be a better employee, leader, and person.

5. Razor Sharp Focus

Neurofuse will help to put all of your cognitive capacity into the task at hand. It is kind of like an artificial “flow” state where you can block almost all distractions out of your mind and pay attention to your work. These are important for days when you are sleep deprived or on a deadline, which can seem to be every day.

6. Stress Is Chemical - Destroy It.

Stress is without a doubt one of the worst parts of the job. Not only is it unhealthy, it makes you irritable and leaves you often making poor decisions. If there is one chemical condition that can be blamed for making life bad, it’s cortisol. Neurofuse has Bacopa Monnieri and vitamin B3 work to regulate cortisol and protect your brain from oxidative stress with potent antioxidants that can minimize your perception of stress.

7. No Amphetamine Related Health Risk

Many popular pharmaceutical grade smart pills contain or metabolize into addictive amphetamines. Tolerance increases rapidly, meaning that you will have to constantly increase dosage to maintain the desired effect. Overdose can lead to psychosis, hypertension and chest pain. Neurofuse and other over-the-counter nootropics do not pose this risk.

8. Increase Blood Flow To Brain

Working on Wall Street you are constantly analyzing about a million different things — your brain gets fatigued. Your brain completely relies upon a constant source of blood and oxygen to operate at its fullest capacity. Vinpocetine, found in Neurofuse, causes vasodilation, which is the widening of the main arteries that deliver blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain.

9. Cheaper Than Your Daily Coffee Habit

Many productivity rockstars are highly dependent upon the dark nectar of wired-up bitterness. While coffee is a great source of antioxidants, it likely contains mold and mycotoxins which are bad for your brain. The cost, in time and money of a daily coffee habit (ESPECIALLY if you frequent coffee shops), is almost 3x as much as a month’s worth of Neurofuse.

10. You Can Try It For Free

Any good nootropic formula will let you try it for free and see if it works. Neurofuse offers a 14 day free trial with a 100% money back guarantee. If you don’t feel the results then you are able to return your bottle for a full refund. You can try it risk free here.

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Bloomberg: How Wall Street's Stomachs Fared During The Hurricane

...when Falcone and five LightSquared colleagues met over a meal of white-truffle pasta and Barolo at a Washington restaurant in January, they failed to come up with anything they could have done differently, according to a person who was there who asked not to be identified because the meeting was private.-- Falcone Waits For Icahn Doubling Down On Network When JPMorgan, which earned the most of any of the six banks over the four quarters, decided to thank employees for their performance this year, it sent 161,680 individually wrapped buttercream-frosted, chocolate chip, oatmeal-raisin and sugar cookies to retail branches and call centers in the U.S., U.K., Philippines and India.-- No Joy On Wall Street As Biggest Banks Earn $63 Billion Cooperman, 68, said in an interview that he can’t walk through the dining room of St. Andrews Country Club in Boca Raton, Florida, without being thanked for speaking up. At least four people expressed their gratitude on Dec. 5 while he was eating an egg-white omelet, he said.--Bankers Join Billionaires To Debunk 'Imbecile' Attack On Top 1% American International Group Chief Executive Officer Robert Benmosche, 66, a Kappa Beta Phi member who disclosed in October that he was undergoing treatment for cancer, was there. He looked energetic, the two attendees said. In 1930, the dinner was beefsteak. This year, the meal featured lobster salad, shrimp, pigs-in-a-blanket, lamb chops and pistachio ice cream.-- Wall Street Secret Society Kappa Beta Phi Adds Dealmakers With Lehman Rite Wall Street headhunter Daniel Arbeeny said his “income has gone down tremendously.” On a recent Sunday, he drove to Fairway Market in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn to buy discounted salmon for $5.99 a pound.--Wall Street Bonus Withdrawal Means Trading Aspen For Coupons The clam-juice cocktails at the private Stock Exchange Luncheon Club, where brokers lined up three deep at the raw bar, contained tomato juice, cooled water from boiled chowder clams, ketchup, celery salt and the option of a freshly shucked clam. Add vodka and they called it a Red Snapper.--How America Ceded Capitalism's Bastion To German Boerse Seizing Big Board As someone once said, you can find out a lot about a man or woman's character during moments of great crisis. Do they fall apart? Do they become shells of their former selves? Do the worst parts of them come out? Do they turn their backs on everything they supposedly once stood for? Or do they, even in moments of darkness, rise to the occasion and demonstrate the morals and values they held when times were good are the very same ones they choose to live by when times are bad? For Bloomberg News reporter Max Abelson, Hurricane Sandy was a test. Would he turn in an article containing few if any reference to the food people consumed during the natural disaster? Or would his commitment to bringing readers exhaustive details re: what his Wall Street subjects eat (see above, here, and here) burn ever bright, to the extent that sources and interviewees elaborating on their situation beyond provisions would find themselves cut off and told, "Just the food and drink, toots. I got a lotta calls to make"? Luckily for us, it was the latter. Herewith, an accounting of things stuffed down the gullets of Wall Street over the last two days: * Murry Stegelmann, Kilimanjaro Advisors: expensive wine, green tea. “I had to go to the wine cellar and find a good bottle of wine and drink it before it goes bad,” Murry Stegelmann, 50, a founder of investment-management firm Kilimanjaro Advisors LLC, wrote in an e-mail after he lost power at 6 p.m. on Oct. 29 in Darien, Connecticut. The bottle he chose, a 2005 Chateau Margaux, was given 98 points by wine critic Robert Parker and is on sale at the Westchester Wine Warehouse for $999.99. “Outstanding,” Stegelmann said. He started the day with green tea at Starbucks, talking with neighbors about the New York Yankees’ future and moving boats to the parking lot of Darien’s Middlesex Middle School. * Wilson Ervin, Credit Suisse: the most depressing breakfast ever. Erin...went to the bank’s office at 11 Madison Ave. afterward to work on evaluations of managing directors and financial regulation. He ate a lunch of Raisin Bran, coffee and a banana from the 7-Eleven downstairs, he said. * Pablo Salame, Goldman Sachs: sushi, the piece of which Abelson or his research assistant counted. He posted a picture of 21 pieces of sushi on a Twitter account in his name on Oct. 29. “Only in NYC, Seamless Sandy sushi delivery in TriBeCa, Monday 730 pm,” the post said. * Wilbur Ross, WL Ross And Co: a painting. “I was scheduled to come back Sunday night, and I decided not to, because everything during the week would be canceled anyway,” said Ross, chairman of private-equity firm WL Ross & Co. “I’m stuck in Palm Beach.” He stayed in touch with colleagues using a fax machine along with phone and e-mail. His Florida home includes a painting by Rene Magritte of petrified blue apples, an image that is also depicted on a custom-made Van Cleef & Arpels watch he owns, he told Bloomberg News this year. * JPMorgan employees: many of the culinary delights its cafeteria offers on a regular basis but NO DUMPLINGS. JPMorgan, which sent out more than a dozen hurricane updates to its employees featuring detailed weather maps, kept parts of its 270 Park Ave. cafeteria open yesterday. Danishes and scones were available near the salad bar, and the bank’s deli had sandwiches with grilled vegetables. The dumpling bar was closed. Wall Street Finds Sandy Silver Lining In Wine, Monopoly [Bloomberg] Related: Things People Have Eaten in the Presence of Bloomberg Reporter Max Abelson [Daily Intel]