If You Want A Raise This Year, It Helps To Have A B-School Degree And A Pair Of Testicles

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And despite much talk that women are afraid to ask for more money, PayScale found a relatively small gender gap: 44% of men have requested raises, compared with 42% of women. And the breakdown of who received the full amount of the raise, a partial increase, or nothing at all was also roughly equal. Surprisingly, the largest disparity appeared for professionals with M.B.A.s. While 63% of male business-school graduates who asked for higher pay were granted those raises, only 48% of their female peers were. And 21% of the women got no salary hike at all, versus just 10% of the men. [WSJ]

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