Bloomberg: Hunt And Fish Club A Great Place To Dine If You Like The Taste Of "All-Natural Homemade Cleaning Product"

Also, tater-tots that smell "like a petrol station on a very hot day."
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Back in January, after an interminable wait, the Hunt and Fish Club opened its doors. At the time, we were told what sorts of people would consider themselves at home at the Wall Street-backed establishment. They included: Women who want to be "declawed like lobsters"; reality TV stars associated with the mob; Jay Gatsby; Frank Sinatra; executive assistants; Dean Martin; and people who want to take their shoes off while they eat. Today, we learn what they can expect should they choose to order anything. According to Bloomberg, it's not great!

... the meat on a recent evening was corpse-cold, under-seasoned, and cooked so unevenly that it was nearly blue on one side while the other was bloodless and grey. The beef had been mistreated on the carving board as well—sliced into inelegant, crooked pieces that varied wildly in thickness. About 15 minutes after the porterhouse landed, just as the fat on the slate had begun to congeal, the béarnaise arrived in a small silver pitcher. The buttery emulsion appeared to have traveled a great distance and it was exhausted. It was no longer glossy and smooth but dull and deflated, tasting only of white vinegar, like some kind of all-natural, homemade cleaning product...

"This is a little piece of heaven," the waitress told me as she set down a plate of truffle tater tots—a side she’d singled out earlier in the evening as a must-order. Our ideas of the afterlife must be quite different. The tots were enormous, each big enough for several bites. Some had burned crevices but insides filled with strips of raw potato. The tots were doused in so much truffle oil, they smelled like a petrol station on a very hot day. Truffle oil tastes nothing like the real thing, and it should be used sparingly—ideally, not at all. Truffle oil is to fresh truffles as the light of your screen is to the sun. It’s also a bully, edging out every other scent in the room with its intense, artificial clobber. Just as Hunt & Fish is to elegant Manhattan steakhouses: a loud and often clumsy imitation.

Make your reservation today.

Hunt & Fish Club Review: Hedge Funder Crimes Against Truffles [Bloomberg]

Earlier: Hunt And Fish Club Opens Its Doors To Wall Street Insiders, The Great Gatsby, Women Who Want To Be “Declawed Like A Lobster”

Related

Great News: Hunting Guest Of Louis Bacon Not Permanently Blinded By Bullets To The Face

His throat and arms, also hit, are okay, too. The chairman of auction house Sotheby’s has been shot in the face during a grouse shoot. Henry Wyndham would have been blinded had he not been wearing glasses when the accident occurred last Monday, the first day of the grouse shooting season. The Old Etonian was standing at his post – referred to in the shooting world as a grouse ‘butt’ – when a neighbouring gun was accidentally fired towards him, spraying shot in his arm, throat and face. Mr Wyndham was airlifted to hospital from the Scottish moor where the incident took place. He was treated for 52 lead pellet wounds. The accident took place on a hired estate on a shoot organised by American hedge-fund manager Louis Bacon, 56. Sotheby’s Chairman Henry Wyndham Shot On Grouse Moor [Bloomberg] Sotheby's chief airlifted from grouse shoot after being blasted by 52 pellets [DailyMail]

Bloomberg: How Wall Street's Stomachs Fared During The Hurricane

...when Falcone and five LightSquared colleagues met over a meal of white-truffle pasta and Barolo at a Washington restaurant in January, they failed to come up with anything they could have done differently, according to a person who was there who asked not to be identified because the meeting was private.-- Falcone Waits For Icahn Doubling Down On Network When JPMorgan, which earned the most of any of the six banks over the four quarters, decided to thank employees for their performance this year, it sent 161,680 individually wrapped buttercream-frosted, chocolate chip, oatmeal-raisin and sugar cookies to retail branches and call centers in the U.S., U.K., Philippines and India.-- No Joy On Wall Street As Biggest Banks Earn $63 Billion Cooperman, 68, said in an interview that he can’t walk through the dining room of St. Andrews Country Club in Boca Raton, Florida, without being thanked for speaking up. At least four people expressed their gratitude on Dec. 5 while he was eating an egg-white omelet, he said.--Bankers Join Billionaires To Debunk 'Imbecile' Attack On Top 1% American International Group Chief Executive Officer Robert Benmosche, 66, a Kappa Beta Phi member who disclosed in October that he was undergoing treatment for cancer, was there. He looked energetic, the two attendees said. In 1930, the dinner was beefsteak. This year, the meal featured lobster salad, shrimp, pigs-in-a-blanket, lamb chops and pistachio ice cream.-- Wall Street Secret Society Kappa Beta Phi Adds Dealmakers With Lehman Rite Wall Street headhunter Daniel Arbeeny said his “income has gone down tremendously.” On a recent Sunday, he drove to Fairway Market in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn to buy discounted salmon for $5.99 a pound.--Wall Street Bonus Withdrawal Means Trading Aspen For Coupons The clam-juice cocktails at the private Stock Exchange Luncheon Club, where brokers lined up three deep at the raw bar, contained tomato juice, cooled water from boiled chowder clams, ketchup, celery salt and the option of a freshly shucked clam. Add vodka and they called it a Red Snapper.--How America Ceded Capitalism's Bastion To German Boerse Seizing Big Board As someone once said, you can find out a lot about a man or woman's character during moments of great crisis. Do they fall apart? Do they become shells of their former selves? Do the worst parts of them come out? Do they turn their backs on everything they supposedly once stood for? Or do they, even in moments of darkness, rise to the occasion and demonstrate the morals and values they held when times were good are the very same ones they choose to live by when times are bad? For Bloomberg News reporter Max Abelson, Hurricane Sandy was a test. Would he turn in an article containing few if any reference to the food people consumed during the natural disaster? Or would his commitment to bringing readers exhaustive details re: what his Wall Street subjects eat (see above, here, and here) burn ever bright, to the extent that sources and interviewees elaborating on their situation beyond provisions would find themselves cut off and told, "Just the food and drink, toots. I got a lotta calls to make"? Luckily for us, it was the latter. Herewith, an accounting of things stuffed down the gullets of Wall Street over the last two days: * Murry Stegelmann, Kilimanjaro Advisors: expensive wine, green tea. “I had to go to the wine cellar and find a good bottle of wine and drink it before it goes bad,” Murry Stegelmann, 50, a founder of investment-management firm Kilimanjaro Advisors LLC, wrote in an e-mail after he lost power at 6 p.m. on Oct. 29 in Darien, Connecticut. The bottle he chose, a 2005 Chateau Margaux, was given 98 points by wine critic Robert Parker and is on sale at the Westchester Wine Warehouse for $999.99. “Outstanding,” Stegelmann said. He started the day with green tea at Starbucks, talking with neighbors about the New York Yankees’ future and moving boats to the parking lot of Darien’s Middlesex Middle School. * Wilson Ervin, Credit Suisse: the most depressing breakfast ever. Erin...went to the bank’s office at 11 Madison Ave. afterward to work on evaluations of managing directors and financial regulation. He ate a lunch of Raisin Bran, coffee and a banana from the 7-Eleven downstairs, he said. * Pablo Salame, Goldman Sachs: sushi, the piece of which Abelson or his research assistant counted. He posted a picture of 21 pieces of sushi on a Twitter account in his name on Oct. 29. “Only in NYC, Seamless Sandy sushi delivery in TriBeCa, Monday 730 pm,” the post said. * Wilbur Ross, WL Ross And Co: a painting. “I was scheduled to come back Sunday night, and I decided not to, because everything during the week would be canceled anyway,” said Ross, chairman of private-equity firm WL Ross & Co. “I’m stuck in Palm Beach.” He stayed in touch with colleagues using a fax machine along with phone and e-mail. His Florida home includes a painting by Rene Magritte of petrified blue apples, an image that is also depicted on a custom-made Van Cleef & Arpels watch he owns, he told Bloomberg News this year. * JPMorgan employees: many of the culinary delights its cafeteria offers on a regular basis but NO DUMPLINGS. JPMorgan, which sent out more than a dozen hurricane updates to its employees featuring detailed weather maps, kept parts of its 270 Park Ave. cafeteria open yesterday. Danishes and scones were available near the salad bar, and the bank’s deli had sandwiches with grilled vegetables. The dumpling bar was closed. Wall Street Finds Sandy Silver Lining In Wine, Monopoly [Bloomberg] Related: Things People Have Eaten in the Presence of Bloomberg Reporter Max Abelson [Daily Intel]

What Are Your Thoughts On Fly Fishing With Paul Volcker?

Just you, PV, a friend you deem worthy to tag along and the open water. You can talk about life, fish, and what banking was like in the fifties. Does that sound like something you'd be interested in? Would you go so far as to call it a dream of yours?