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Bonus Watch '15: Citi CEOs

The board has decided Corbat did a 10 percent shittier job last year than in 2013.
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Apparently Citi CEOs fared slightly worse than Bank of America CEOs and considerably worse than JP Morgan CEOs in 2014.

Citigoup cut Chief Executive Michael Corbat's pay by about 10 percent in 2014, a year in which the bank's profit nearly halved due to higher legal costs and a slump in bond trading...Corbat earned an estimated $13.1 million in 2014, including deferred shares worth about $3.49 million based on the stock's Thursday close. He earned $14.5 million in 2013. Deferred stock makes up 30 percent of Corbat's bonus pay under Citi's compensation plan, which was overhauled two years ago amid shareholder pressure. Bank of America Corp cut Chairman and Chief Executive Brian Moynihan's pay by 7 percent in 2014, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters. In contrast to Moynihan and Corbat's smaller pay packages, JPMorgan & Co (JPM.N) Chief Executive Jamie Dimon earned $20 million in 2014, unchanged from a year earlier.

Citigroup cut CEO Corbat's pay by 10 percent to $13.1 million in 2014 [Reuters]

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