Harvard Business School Considers Moving Into The 21st Century

It's losing ground to Stanford and MIT when it comes to educating its students re: tech, and that cannot stand.
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The unbridgeable bridged gap.

Like its Philadelphianrival, Harvard Business School is having something of an existential crisis. Its patented case-study curriculum has been found to have a critical flaw: It cannot analyze the cases of the present or future, many of which involve technology, which HBS has apparently been doing a less-than-stellar job of preparing students for, especially when compared to the business school on the other side of the Charles—in part because that school is, you know, MIT, and in part because HBS students chafe at the thought of walking across the river to Harvard’s engineering school. Is it time to start over in Boston? Or maybe just wait until the eggheads move in across the street?

The institution that required students to carry laptops as early as 1984 and sent graduates to top posts at Hewlett-Packard Co. and Facebook Inc. is not keeping up when it comes to teaching management in a tech-focused era, say students, faculty and alumni. Meanwhile, competitors like Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management have established themselves as pre-eminent tech-industry feeders, according to the schools’ annual career reports….

Compared with MIT and Stanford, “we have, in a sense, less tech in the air,” says the business school’s dean, Nitin Nohria….

One issue, Mr. Nohria says, is geography. MIT and Stanford’s engineering and business schools are near one another and tightly integrated; by contrast, Harvard’s engineering school is a nearly mile-long trek across the Charles River from HBS.

Should Harvard Business School Hit Refresh? [WSJ]

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