Dennis Kozlowski 'Bout Ready To Print Up New Business Cards

The ex-con has plans to run an M&A consulting shop, if you know anyone who's interested.
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Remember Dennis Kozlowski? Used to run a company called Tyco until he was found guilty on counts of grand larceny, conspiracy, and securities fraud, for doing things like 1) Awarding himself $105 million in 2000 when maybe he should’ve taken a bit less, 2) Outfitting the bathroom in his company-funded apartment with a $6,000 shower curtain 3) Throwing his wife a birthday party in Sardinia that cost (Tyco) $2 million, on account of the performance by Jimmy Buffett, the togas for the guests, and the “ice sculpture of Michelangelo’s David spewing vodka from his penis and a birthday cake in the shape of a woman’s breasts with sparklers mounted on top"? After a few years in the joint, decided that corporate greed offended him? Anyway, he's a free man these days and is looking to get back in the game.

Although Mr. Kozlowski would not discuss his remaining financial assets, he says he “owns no real estate” and is no longer fabulously wealthy. He still owns a “minuscule percentage” of the New York Yankees, but he said it produced no income and might be worth “in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.” Now that he’s free, he hopes to open his own “small M.&A. advisory shop.”

Prospective clients and colleagues: get in touch.

Tyco’s ‘Piggy,’ Out of the Pen and Living Small [NYT]

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