Deutsche Bank Paid Another Fine But It Was Only $55 Million

Which, relatively speaking, is basically like not paying a fine at all.
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Compared to those multi-billion dollar ones, this fine is NBD.

Deutsche Bank AG has agreed to pay $55 million to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to settle allegations it hid paper losses of more than $1.5 billion during the financial crisis that began in 2008. The giant German lender said it didn’t admit or deny the allegations and that no charges were brought against individuals in the matter.

Deutsche Bank Agrees to Pay $55 Million to SEC [WSJ]

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