Greeks Might Just Pull This Thing Out

"Some promising things have happened."
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Alexis Tsipras may yet escape this guy's fate.

Europe’s long continental nightmare isn’t at an end. It may not even be at the beginning of the end. But, after Athens proposed making employers pay some more into its pension system so that it could pay less, it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.

“Some promising things have happened, including today’s talks,” said European Council President Donald Tusk. “The latest Greek proposals are the first real proposals in many weeks….”

A first assessment from the institutions overseeing Greece’s bailout—the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund—found the new plans to be “broad and comprehensive,” said Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the Dutch finance minister who presided over the talks….The Greek proposal has been described by Greek and European officials as possibly the country’s final chance to unlock its bailout program and avoid a potentially catastrophic exit from the eurozone. Negotiations between the creditors and Greece would now continue “with a view of reaching a final agreement later this week,” Mr. Dijsselbloem said.

Greek Bailout Proposals Lift Hopes of Deal [WSJ]

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This Is The Last Greek CDS Post Ever*

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This Is Really Only The "Second" Greek Bailout?

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