Penny Stock Scam Artist Arrested During Layover En Route To Mexico Will Be Sure To Book Direct Flight Next Time

Gregg R. Mulholland learned this the hard way.
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Thinking of committing some sort of white collar crime in the near-ish future? Also considering taking some time off to relax on a beach with a couple margaritas in between scams? Learn from the mistakes of those before you! Don't cheap out on airline tickets! Spending few hundred bucks upfront for that nonstop flight will be worth it when you're not approached by federal agents while waiting in line at the Cinnabon kiosk before boarding your connecting flight.

A man suspected of being the mastermind of a $300 million penny-stock trading scheme is in federal custody because the international flight he was traveling on from Canada to Mexico made a brief stop in Phoenix. The layover on Tuesday at the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport gave F.B.I. agents enough time to arrest Gregg R. Mulholland and charge him with overseeing the manipulation of numerous penny stocks and then laundering the profits through accounts at no fewer than five offshore law firms.

A Layover Ends in Penny-Stock Scheme Arrest [NYT]

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