Will No One Think Of The Tourists In Mykonos?!

This is a story about the real victims of Greece's financial crisis.
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Athens is getting its ass ripped open on a daily basis, sure, but what's a little rioting/bank closures/mass layoffs/Hades on earth compared to agony of ordering a bottle of Château Rayas and being informed only [whispers] Spyros Hatziyiannis Santorini is available?

At Nammos, the hottest daytime restaurant/club in Mykonos, the champagne was flowing, house beats were thumping and 20-somethings danced on table tops in bikinis and swim shorts. Prices were steep – about 15-20 euros ($16-21) for a cocktail. But that didn't stop tourists from trying their luck at getting a reservation. The average waiting time for lunch was 2 hours last Friday. "Mykonos is in its own bubble. Tourists continue to vacation here…despite concerns over Greece's financial state," said Jacopo Janniello Ravagna, owner of Caravana Montacristo, a boutique that specializes in bohemian chic clothes and leather tasselled handbags...but that doesn't mean business hasn't been affected....[a] beachside restaurant in Mykonos said they haven't been able to serve French and Italians wines to guests for the last three weeks. "We've been trying to aggressively market Greek wine and liquor…but that doesn't always go down well with customers who have a refined palette."

Are you listening Angela Merkel? Show some mercy for Christ's sake!

What Greek crisis? In Mykonos, the party doesn’t stop [CNBC]

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