Jefferies Distressed Debt Team Lost A Little Money

You win some, you lose ($100 million) some.
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A team of distressed-debt traders at Jefferies Group lost almost $100 million this year as the rout in oil prices battered the value of bonds and loans of energy companies, according to people with knowledge of the performance. The trading group incurred most of its losses from energy companies including Samson Resources, the driller that said Aug. 14 it was planning to file for bankruptcy protection, the people said Thursday. [Blooomberg]

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