Bitcoin Direct CEO: Mike Tyson Kind Of A Digital Currency Genius

Next time you're in Vegas, get your bitcoins from Mike Tyson's face.
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If you're in Vegas this weekend and running short on bitcoins, you're in luck-- Mike Tyson is now dispensing digital currency on the strip. Somewhat amazingly, the CEO of the company he signed into a branding deal with claims that while Tyson doesn't know the first thing about how ATM machines work, he's got a pretty solid graps on digital currencies.

The ATMs are a 50/50 partnership between Tyson and Bitcoin Direct, Peter Klamka, the CEO of the company, told The Post. Klamka signed his deal with Tyson after pondering what “celebrity cuts across all generations, all borders, all cultures and all ethnic groups,” he said. “People from Brooklyn to Beijing know the guy,” Klamka explained. The meeting went unusually well because Tyson — unbeknownst to his future partner — already had an interest in digital currencies, he said. “All I had to do was talk him through the mechanics of how an ATM works,” Klamka said. “From there it was contract to installation in eight weeks.”

Mike Tyson’s new bitcoin ATM machines [NYP]

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