DraftKings Sees Eric Schneiderman's Political Overreach And Raises Him A David Boies

It's like a game of daily corporate lawyer fantasy.
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Daily fantasy sports site DraftKings is pretty apoplectic to find themselves being picked on by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

How pissed are they? Well they're apparently David Boies-level pissed.

Here's a statement released this morning from a DraftKings spokesperson:

"DraftKings has added David Boies and Jonathan Schiller, who founded the law firm of Boies Schiller & Flexner LLP, a nationally recognized litigation firm, to its legal team. Together, David and Jonathan have represented the NFL in an antitrust dispute brought by the NFL Players Association, as well as the NBA players in a dispute over the negotiation of their collective bargaining agreement. Since founding BSF LLP, they have successfully represented sports franchises, regional sports networks, and major television networks in regulatory and litigation matters.

Mr. Boies, Mr. Schiller and their team look forward to representing DraftKings, and joining their top flight legal team, which will work with the regulatory agencies, including the New York Attorney General, to resolve this dispute. A swift resolution would protect the rights of consumers and allow DraftKings players to continue to play the fantasy sports games so many people love."

Boies is a regular at the Supreme Court, having argued everything from antitrust cases involving the likes of Microsoft (NASD: MSFT) to the constitutionality of gay marriage. He was also Maurice Greenberg's lawyer in his suit against AIG (NYSE: AIG).

Now he will help DraftKings argue that they aren't a gambling website, because zeitgeist.

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Highland Capital Management Founder Sees Your Hiding Of Assets And Raises You A Megalomaniacal Prick

As some of you may recall, back in March, Highland Capital Management founder and CEO James Dondero testified that he is "insolvent under Texas family law, if not according to normal accounting rules," despite a 2010 tax return showing his adjusted gross income that year to be in excess of $36 million. The reason his finances were in question was because Dondero filed for divorce in September, and how much he owes his wife Becky is currently in dispute. Becky is "seeking enforcement of a prenuptial agreement guaranteeing her half of the couple’s community property, capped at $5 million," plus "spousal support and interim attorney fees." James, perhaps you can glean, is hoping it will be less than that and perhaps even nothing. One thing that really didn't help? Patrick Daugherty, a former senior portfolio manager at Highland who quit in October, testified that he met with James Dondero for drinks last month. “He told me his plan was to get his net worth down and pay her as little as possible,” said Daugherty, who was called to the stand by Becky Dondero. That testimony was given on March 28th. On April 11, this happened: Highland Capital Management, the $20 billion hedge fund and private equity firm based in Dallas, has launched a lawsuit that calls its former private equity investing chief a “megalomaniacal” manager who engaged in “abusive tirades” that “dehumanized employees.” Patrick Daugherty is the former head of stressed special situations and private equity at Highland Capital Management, where he was responsible for $8 billion of assets until he resigned in September 2011. Known as a blunt-speaking Texan, Daugherty has served on the board of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and as chairman of companies like Cornerstone Health Group. According to a 14-page complaint Highland filed in Texas state court in Dallas earlier in April, Daugherty has been paid in excess of $26 million while at the firm, but voluntarily resigned after “Highland refused to accede to his unacceptable ultimatums and megalomaniacal demands regarding compensation.” The lawsuit claims that Daugherty was “belligerent to peers” and that Highland employees complained and even quit after Daugherty publicly berated them as “‘f—ing idiots’” and disparaged them using other vulgarities. Highland, which has a reputation in the investment community for using hard-hitting tactics, pulls no punches in a lawsuit that at times can appear cruel. It claims that Daugherty’s tenure at Highland was characterized by extreme behavior and his performance diminished over the years as he “became increasingly unmanageable, erratic, and insubordinate.” It didn't have to be this way, Patrick! $20 Billion Highland Capital Calls Former Private Equity Chief "Megalomaniacal" [Forbes]