Credit Suisse To Sweeten Situation For Junior Mistmakers

The Swiss bank is letting analysts put on associate pants after just two years.
Author:
Publish date:

The investment bank told juniors on Thursday that it would make changes to its promotion cycle in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, bringing it in line with the United States where the practice was introduced in summer 2013, sources familiar with the situation told Reuters. A spokeswoman for Credit Suisse confirmed the plans. The program, due to start in July, will enable top-performing analysts - the first rung on the investment banking ladder - to become associates in just two years rather than three, meaning they can reach vice-president level after 5-1/2 years rather than 6-1/2. [Reuters]

Related

Promotion Watch '12: Credit Suisse

Recent events might have had you thinking otherwise, but Credit Suisse does more than just layoff its employees-- sometimes it promotes them, too! Earlier this morning, in fact, the Swiss bumped a whole bunch of guys and girls up to managing director. And even though it's not grundle-to-face level exciting, it's still something.

Layoffs Watch '12: Credit Suisse

The Swiss bank is not done with its firings. Credit Suisse, the second- biggest Swiss bank, told New York state regulators it will eliminate 126 jobs in Manhattan over the coming months. The dismissals affect offices at 1 Madison Ave. and 11 Madison Ave. and will extend through Aug. 6, the bank wrote in a Department of Labor filing. The firm decided last year to scale down its investment bank and said it would cut 3,500 jobs. [Bloomberg]

Pay Hike Watch '15: Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank

Credit Suisse and Deutsche Bank are said to be raising junior banker base pay. This is happening so the banks can cut said junior bankers' bonuses so senior bankers don't have to feel bad about themselves. Just go with it.

Layoffs Watch '12: Credit Suisse

While Brady Dougan is keeping his job, the same cannot be said for 1/3 of European investment bankers. Credit Suisse is to cut senior staff in its European investment banking department by up to a third, three sources familiar with the matter said, as tighter regulation and weak markets hit the sector. "In the European investment banking business, they are going to get rid of 60 directors and managing directors," one source said on Monday. The investment banking department affected advises on mergers and acquisitions, stock market listings, financing and debt issues, as opposed to other areas of the broader investment bank that focus on securities trading. "It is about a third of the directors and 10-15 percent of the MDs," the first source said, referring to what are typically two most senior job ranks in the banking world. The layoffs would happen in July, this person said. The formal redundancy process can last several months. A second source said the cuts could end up affecting 20-30 percent of senior investment banking staff in Europe. Credit Suisse To Make Heavy Job Cuts In Europe [Reuters]

Layoffs Watch '12: Deutsche Bank, Barclays, Nomura, Credit Suisse, UBS

Things could be better in Europe. Big investment banks in Europe, including Nomura, Credit Suisse and UBS, are stepping up plans to cut jobs as they seek to adapt to a drastic slowdown in revenues and tighter regulation. Bank executives, headhunters and analysts say that the cuts are shaping up as the deepest since the start of the financial crisis after a disappointing summer dashed hopes of a business revival. One senior headhunter said many large investment banks will have “at least 20 per cent” fewer staff in capital markets and M&A advisory business in Europe by the end of the year compared with late 2011. “It [the market] has never been as bad as this. Bankers have long lost confidence in their banks but now they are also losing their self-confidence, their mojo,” a senior advisory banker said. Among the banks that will reduce their investment banking workforce is Japan’s Nomura, where London-based bankers say that they expect several hundred jobs to be removed in Europe alone as part of a $1bn cost-cutting effort. Switzerland’s largest bank UBS, which cut staff levels earlier than rivals by announcing 2,000 job cuts in the investment bank after a $2.3bn unauthorised trading loss last year, is preparing for intensified cuts as it is seeking to streamline further the unit, several people familiar with the situation said. At Credit Suisse, insiders estimate that the additional SFr1bn ($1bn) in groupwide cuts that were announced in July will translate into up to 1,000 jobs being lost, most of which would be in the investment bank. Analysts expect also Deutsche Bank and Barclays to reduce their headcount further this year. Deutsche said two months ago it would reduce staff levels by 1,900. Investment Banks Eye Europe Job Cuts [FT]