Daimler Shareholders Can't Get Enough Sausage

The most embarrassing event in the auto industry since the great Fiat pasta fight of 1908.
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If you buy into stereotypes, you would think that shareholder meetings at German auto companies would be a staid and regimented affair at which everyone behaved themselves and got scheiße done.

Daimler Sausage

Well, according to Bloomberg, we have an awesome new reason to stop buying into stereotypes...

As Daimler AG shareholders approved the biggest dividend in the company’s history, two investors got into a fight at its annual general meeting over complimentary sausages.
The world’s second-biggest luxury-car maker called police to calm things down after one man began packing away multiple sausages from the buffet. A woman intervened, and the two got into a verbal altercation.

Sausage fight!!!

Daimler served about 12,500 wursts to the 5,500 shareholders who attended the meeting in Berlin, spokeswoman Silke Walters said. Buffets that can cost far more than one share of stock are part of the culture of European shareholder meetings, which can drone on the better part of a full day as investors chow down on everything from hearty pretzels and bratwurst to coffee and cake.

We're no math geniuses but it appears that Daimler only budgeted for 2.7 wursts per shareholder. Now, Germany is renowned for its thriftiness, but laying out anything less than three sausages per person for a full day meeting will only result in violence.

You can't treat your shareholders like Greeks, Daimler.

Sausage Spat Erupts as Daimler Shareholders Battle at Buffet [Bloomberg]

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