Ex-UBS Trader And Member Of Forex Manipulation Cartel Dubbed 'The Mafia' Forgot Snitches Get Stiches

Come on, Matt Gardiner.
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Or maybe the rules of a mob made up of currency traders from large banks are different from those of the Cosa Nostra? Seems unlikely, but who's to say? Either way, Matt Gardiner can probably kiss his 20-year co-conspirator reunion invite goodbye.

A currency trader from the Cartel chatroom -- the instant-messaging group the U.S. government named in wringing guilty pleas from five global banks -- has been helping prosecutors who are trying to build foreign-exchange manipulation cases against individuals, according to two people familiar with the matter. The cooperator, they said, is Matt Gardiner, a former UBS Group AG trader known in the chatroom as Fossil. U.S. officials are confident they will be able to charge individuals over currency-rate manipulation, possibly as soon as this summer, a third person said. Announcing the bank convictions in May 2015, the U.S. said traders working for the institutions -- UBS, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Citigroup Inc., Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc and Barclays Plc -- had conspired in the instant-messaging group, which participants also referred to as the Mafia.
Though the Justice Department said individual charges were likely in the matter, a year has passed without further action.

Ex-UBS Trader in ‘Cartel’ Said to Help U.S. in Currency Probe [Bloomberg]

Related

UBS Whistleblower's $104 Million Award Poses Interesting Conundrum For Would-Be Snitches

Remember Bradley Birkenfeld? He's the guy who single-handedly made the U.S. government’s case against UBS and forced the Swiss bank to hand over the names of thousands of tax cheats, which resulted in the US scoring $780 million from UBS and may have inspired some 33,000 Americans to "voluntarily disclose offshore accounts to the IRS, generating more than $5 billion." And yet, despite his assistance, Birkenfeld wasn't immediately thanked for a job well done. Instead, he was sentenced to forty months in prison (fair-ish, considering he showed a few clients how to avoid paying taxes himself) and told to piss off by the Internal Revenue Service, from whom he sought an award, because he was "not forthcoming about his own role in the scheme," even as a Justice Department attorney admitted that "...without Mr. Birkenfeld walking into the door of the Department of Justice in the summer of 2007, I doubt as of today that this massive fraud would have been discovered by the US government" (or as his lawyer put it, "They didn't know how to spell UBS until he showed up. He didn't just give them a piece of the puzzle. He gave them the entire puzzle"). Now, after doing 32 months at Schuylkill Federal Correctional Institution, getting let out early on account of "good-time credit," and living in a halfway house in New Hampshire, Birkenfeld has finally been thrown a bone. Bradley Birkenfeld, the former UBS AG banker who told the Internal Revenue Service how the bank helped thousands of Americans evade taxes, secured an IRS award of $104 million, an amount his lawyers said may be the largest ever for a U.S. whistle-blower. Birkenfeld told authorities how UBS bankers came to the U.S. to woo rich Americans, managed $20 billion of their assets, and helped them cheat the IRS. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy in 2008, a year after reporting the bank’s conduct to the Justice Department, U.S. Senate, IRS and Securities and Exchange Commission. He was released from prison Aug. 1...Birkenfeld, 47, worked at Zurich-based UBS, the largest Swiss bank, for five years. He sought a reward from the IRS of as much as 30 percent of any taxes the agency recovered as a result of his whistle-blowing activities. Clearly this whole thing should stir up a few questions inside you all, chief among them: how much money would it take to get you to befriend or get yourself employed with some rogue people so you can blow the whistle on them? Would you do any time for it? If so, how much? And are we talking Club Fed or a place where your roommate spoons you every night? UBS Whistle-Blower Secures $104 Million Award From IRS [Bloomberg]