Goldman Sachs Seeks To Drastically Reduce "Human-To-Human" Interaction In Junior Banking Recruiting

Humans, gross.
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Back in the day, as in up until this year, Goldman Sachs dispatched employees to college campuses across the globe to recruit the Lloyd Blankfeins and Gary Cohns of tomorrow. There, the representatives of the bank engaged in this thing called a "conversation," a phenomenon in which two or more people allow words to exit their mouths. Occasionally, these "conversations" would result in the participants stumbling upon common ground and interests, whether it was hailing from the same home town, a love of chess, or both knowing Mike from AEPi. Disturbingly, these "conversations" sometimes had an impact on who received an invitation to interview at the bank. Luckily, we don't have to worry about that any longer.

Goldman Sachs Group Inc., seeking to curb bias in its selection of junior employees, plans to discontinue on-campus interviews for undergraduates. The move is a part of an overhaul at the New York-based bank that will standardize the recruiting process and seek to eliminate the likelihood that an interviewer chooses a candidate based on traits they share, such as college athletics or extracurricular activities, executives of the firm said Thursday.

BUT BE FOREWARNED:

While the new process reduces human bias, it doesn’t eliminate it. Interviews will still be watched and evaluated by humans who may allow subjective measures to influence their decisions, and the second round, when candidates visit one of the bank’s offices, will still be heavily concentrated on human-to-human interaction, the firm said.

Stupid idiot humans.

Goldman Sachs Scraps On-Campus Interviews for Robo-Recruiting [Bloomberg]

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