If Spending $13 Million In Stolen 1MDB Funds Over A Period Of Three Days In Vegas Is Wrong, The Prime Minister Of Malaysia's Stepson Doesn't Wanna Be Right

Same goes for backing The Wolf Of Wall Street with said funds.
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Not Riza, but could be. (Getty Images)

Not Riza, but could be. (Getty Images)

Say what you will about the $3.5 billion Malaysian development fund fraud, but it apparently afforded Prime Minister Najib Razak's stepson, Riza Aziz, a sweet three-day weekend in Vegas and brought Jordan Belfort's boiler room scamto the big screen.

More than $3.5 billion traveled a trail of fraud from Malaysia through a web of shell companies, fueling a spending binge on Monet paintings and luxury real estate in the U.S. and Britain, with at least $700 million flowing back into accounts controlled by Malaysia’s prime minister. Along the way, some of the money was handled by international banks including Goldman Sachs Group Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Standard Chartered Plc and Deutsche Bank AG. Some of the money funded a Hollywood blockbuster, “The Wolf of Wall Street.” The stepson of Malaysia’s prime minister and associates sent more than $13 million to a Las Vegas casino for three days of gambling for a group that included an unidentified film actor whose description matches that of the film’s star, Leonardo DiCaprio.

U.S. Maps 1MDB Fraud Trail From Kuala Lumpur to Hollywood [Bloomberg]

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Leonardo DiCaprio And Jonah Hill Are Learning How To Be Corrupt Stock Brokers At Bank Of America

For their roles in "The Wolf of Wall Street," based on the memoir by Jordan Belfort, who spent 22 months in a federal prison for running a pump-and-dump scam out of brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont. An inside source at Bank of America Merrill Lynch tells us the actors received some real-life experience for their roles in the Martin Scorsese -directed film by shadowing employees at the One Bryant Park location Tuesday morning. We hear that DiCaprio, who plays New York stock broker Jordan Belfort in the movie, trailed an employee on the fifth floor of the corporate and investment bank, which is the stock-trading floor. Hill, who plays the best friend and business partner of DiCaprio's Belfort, shadowed “a lower-level, yet successful derivative sales associate.” Both actors left before lunchtime, but a second source close to the film, in which DiCaprio’s character refuses to cooperate in a fraud case involving Wall Street corruption and mob infiltration, tells us they have plans to return Wednesday. [NYDN]