Because Wall Street Isn't Donating, Trump Using Pence As A Koch Tease

Sometimes The Donald's gotta do what The Donald's gotta do.
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We've admittedly beat this topic a little bit to death, but it doesn't make it any less true that Wall Street donations to Donald Trump are relatively non-existent.

Trump.Pence.Kochs

And despite his protestations to the contrary, The Donald is not a guy who likes to play the role of money underdog, and now that he's running against the Clinton machine there will need to be a real plan to haul in a lot more cash in the next few weeks.

According to The Times, that plan might already be in action...

From his days as a dissident Republican congressman challenging President George W. Bush, to his battles against his own party while governor of Indiana, Mike Pence has often relied on strong support from powerful allies: the conservative philanthropists David H. and Charles G. Koch and the vast political network they oversee.

Until now, Trump has been running without the blessing of the Koch Brothers or Goldman Sachs, which is a pretty sh!tty way to run for president in 21st century America. But by selecting Pence, Trump is throwing a gold-plated bone in the Kochs general direction, and his name is Mike Pence.

In selecting Mr. Pence as his running mate, Donald J. Trump is not only tapping someone who differs with him on policy and in tone. He has also picked a partner with deep ties to some of the party’s most powerful donors, who have spent years — and hundreds of millions of dollars — trying to steer Republicans away from Mr. Trump’s brand of populism.

The Brothers K love Pence - especially David who been one of the Indiana Governor's career top donors - and their network could be enough to make Trump competitive again in the money race. But Trump's bizarre candidacy is so difficult to pin down that there is no guarantee Pence's name on posters gets the Kochs to start writing checks.

But if they start to help refill Trump's coffers, that might prompt fearful centrists on Wall Street to give to his opponent. In conversations with two employees working at two different large banks, Dealbreaker gets a sense that Trump being so far behind in fundraising has allowed financiers with doubts about Hillary Clinton to stay on the sidelines.

"I'm hardly "With Her"," said one investment banker who identifies as a Republican but claims he has not contributed to either campaign. "But I'm damn sure not "With Him." So if this gets any close I will be tempted do what I can."

But that is not an angle that Trump can really concern himself with at the moment. With major players like Goldman making it clear to its employees that Trump is not good for business, there is even more impetus for Trump to use his week in Cleveland to get Kochy with it. Because while more funding for Trump might lead to a money race, at least he'll be in one.

Unless Hillary picks Warren as her VP, in which case, ignore all of this.

In Choosing Mike Pence, Donald Trump Moves Closer to Big Donors [NYT]

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