Lawsuit: Hiding Under Desks To Look Up Colleagues' Skirts And Licking Their Faces Is Stuff That Happens At AIG

Pervy underwriters are accused of acting like Snowflake Greenberg.
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A lot of things have been said about the old American International Group in recent years.

aig-animalhouse

The Former House of Hank has been dragged through the mud and federal courthouses more than once since being essentially taken over by the Treasury Department but refusing to act like it, and the court of public opinion has been unkind to the firm even after the government sold back it's AIG stock at a profit. And we won't even get into Snowflake Greenberg's inheritance.

But through it all, AIG has pretty much been seen as a massive collection of staid financiers and accountants who just made some bad decisions for a few years, like trying to use taxpayer money as petty cash. AIG never got tarred with the Wall Street bad boy brush though, because one never heard of any randy caveman shenanigans happening just north of the State Island Ferry terminal. But it now appears AIG is looking to maybe make up for lost time...

Take it away, NYPost:

A former AIG underwriter is suing the insurance giant and her ex-boss, claiming the exec perpetuated a “boys club” atmosphere — which included male employees hiding under women’s desks to peek up their skirts, and licking female colleagues.

We read a lot of these things, but even we're unfamiliar with desk-hiding and... umm, licking. We even went so far as to check the actual complaint for the phrase "horned-up toddlers." But let's take a deeper dive:

Marlee Valenti had been an award-winning employee for two years before she was transferred to work under now-Vice President Michael Donnelly, according to her suit, filed Monday in Manhattan Supreme Court.
She then became subject to a “never-ending stream” of harassment from 10 men under Donnelly’s supervision, court papers allege.
“Male employees would sneak under the desks of female employees in order to look up their skirts,” the suit reads.
Valenti and other women were also “groped, licked or forced to endure other forms of harassment” from male colleagues, she says. Valenti was fired after she complained, the suit says.

We have perhaps never seen an allegation so lacking in the unctuous predatory subtlety one usually associates with Wall Street sexual harassment suits. In fact, this kind of detailed description of unhinged pre-adolescent arousal being so commonplace makes us think that AIG has either done an exemplary job of tamping this down over the years or a floodgate is about to open from law offices around Manhattan sending rivers of accusations flowing towards South Ferry.

For their part, AIG said this to The Post:

“We believe this suit and the claims it makes are without merit,” an AIG spokesman said.

We have to disagree. The suit merits at least a few close reads.

Ex-AIG worker sues over ‘never-ending stream’ of harassment [NYP]

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