Kim Jong-Un Has Extra $81 Million To Spend On Rockets That Don’t Work

It's Bangladesh's $81 million, but who's counting?
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The North Korean missile program had a little hiccup today. Its cyberthieving capabilities, not so much: According to federal prosecutors, the Democratic People’s Republic managed to use the same technology it developed to embarrass Aaron Sorkin to steal $81 million in Bangladeshi money from the New York Fed, with a little help from the Chinese. Not that they necessarily needed it.

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The current cases being pursued may not include charges against North Korean officials, but would likely implicate North Korea, people close to the process said—with the U.S. accusing a foreign government of orchestrating one of the biggest bank robberies of modern times.

The efforts to build federal cases, people familiar with the process said, reflect a decision at the Justice Department that there is merit to the view of some private security researchers that the Fed heist was linked to the hacking in 2014 of Sony Pictures Entertainment, which the Federal Bureau of Investigation blamed on North Korea.

U.S. Preparing Cases Linking North Korea to Theft at N.Y. Fed [WSJ]

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