Gary Cohn Won't Let Neo-Nazis Keep Him From Serving Guy Who Defends Neo-Nazis

You gotta have principles.
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As you probably know, the Financial Times caught up with our dear friend Gary Cohn. As you also probably know, Charlottesville came up. Cohn's response:

GaryCohnHamlet

I have come under enormous pressure both to resign and to remain in my current position. As a patriotic American, I am reluctant to leave my post as director of the National Economic Council because I feel a duty to fulfil my commitment to work on behalf of the American people. But I also feel compelled to voice my distress over the events of the last two weeks.

Citizens standing up for equality and freedom can never be equated with white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and the KKK. I believe this administration can and must do better in consistently and unequivocally condemning these groups and do everything we can to heal the deep divisions that exist in our communities. As a Jewish American, I will not allow neo-Nazis ranting “Jews will not replace us” to cause this Jew to leave his job. I feel deep empathy for all who have been targeted by these hate groups. We must all unite together against them.

Just to clear things up, no one has suggested that Cohn leave his post because some Nazis marched around in Charlottesville. It's more about the fact that Cohn's employer, the president, offered the white nationalists succor by repeatedly asserting there were “very fine people” in a crowd that carried torches, chanted things like “blood and soil” and assembled to hear a cast of explicitly, unmistakably white supremacist speakers. That's kind of the issue here.

Gary knows this, of course, which is why he felt the need to rebuke President Trump in terms that were abundantly clear but for the fact that Trump wasn't named in them. And Cohn didn't have to go that far out on the limb. He could have swallowed what's left of his dignity and taken the Mnuchin approach, for instance. But he made his stated, if not acted-upon, principles clear. Good for him?

How Trump will respond is a mystery. He hasn't let Charlottesville go, and he's never taken kindly to dissent in his ranks. But he's also never had a bad word for Gary. That could change now that a reenergized Breitbart has decided to sink its incisors into Cohn's flank and shake until the administration's top (((globalist))) gets the boot. It won't be easy for Trump to ignore his base's instincts and to keep from lashing out at his newest critic.

Which is all to say: anyone wanna place any bets on tax reform timeline?

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