Stanford Will Stop Acting Unethically To Build The Perfect Benetton Ad In Ethics in Management Class

School of capitalism temporarily adopting financial-aid Marxism.
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(Jawed Karim)

(Jawed Karim)

Diversity is an admirable goal. Jeff Sessions and Samuel Alito may not think so, but there is value to being around and working with people who are not carbon copies of yourself, at least according to science. And if you reject things like facts and science, you are probably of the philosophical mindset that private organizations should be free to compose themselves as they see fit and keep their golf courses lily-white and exclusively testicular.

Now, Stanford University is a private organization. And, since it is a university, it believes in science, even at the business school, which even we have to admit is a pretty good one. So it is choosing to exercise its freedom as a private institution to fill its M.B.A. classes with all sorts of non-white, non-male psychopaths, achieving this both with acceptance letters and financial aid packages. Which is fine! Just, like, don’t lie about it and pretend those gaudy diversity numbers happened by accident. Or at least invest in a decent firewall to prevent having to explain it.

For years, Stanford’s prestigious M.B.A. program stated on its website and in communications with applicants that financial assistance was determined solely by a student’s calculated financial need and that it didn’t give merit scholarships for the $225,000 degree. But that policy came under scrutiny last fall, when a data breach exposed around 10 years of financial-aid decisions that included information on students’ income.

Analyzing the exposed data, an M.B.A. student compiled a report showing students with nearly identical financial situations often receive “vastly different” awards and that, on average, women received more aid than men and domestic students were favored over international ones….

The dean of Stanford’s business school acknowledged in a November note to students and staff that the school offered additional awards “to candidates whose biographies make them particularly compelling and competitive in trying to attract a diverse class.”

This means someone now gets a job with a pension to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Until that person gets around to crafting “a transparent and well-understood process that treats students fairly,” the school will abide the rules it imposed on itself and then ignored.

Prospective members of the M.B.A. class of 2020, who started receiving admissions offers in December, will be awarded assistance “solely on the basis of financial need,” according to the email.

Stanford Business School Seeks Review of Financial-Aid Policies [WSJ]

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