Nineteen-Year-Old Paul Tudor Jones Pretty Much What You’d Expect

Beers, bets and bros, in that order.
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 Reliving his pledge days.

Reliving his pledge days.

Paul Tudor Jones once had a reputation for reticence when it came to getting his name in the newspaper. Even today, adjectives like “rare” are applied to his increasingly frequent interviews and public pronouncements, while Jones himself continues to be dubbed “reclusive” and “media shy,” which one must admit are strange terms to use for a man who regularly invites the general public into his gated community for some holiday cheer and who marks his advancing age with serenades from the Jo(h)ns, Bon Jovi and Fogerty. In reality, Jones’ relative quiet was probably a combination of the decades-old ban on marketing that kept most hedge fund managers from running their mouths off to the press, and an understandable caution on the part of the star of Trader. I mean, it’s one thing to buy up the rights and all of the copies of a 1987 PBS documentary. It’s another thing entirely to try to wipe from the Internet statements like “you will never see as many great women investors or traders as men,” or your assurances of “love” to Harvey Weinstein, or getting caught up in a “Hamilton” Ponzi scheme.

Whether due to the 2012 junking of the anti-solicitation rule, or his growing desire to be on the right side of history and the post-revolutionary firing squads, PTJ’s gottenawfullychattyrecently, and he doesn’t even have a book to sell. But allow him to secondone author’s opinion that keg stands are more important than calculus (or even journalism classes) during one’s collegiate years, and also to confirm the stereotypes those of us who have seen Traderalready assumed of the young Jones.

While in college at the University of Virginia, he picked up chess and backgammon. He was also the bookie in his fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

“By the time I graduated from college, I already had probably at least a masters in probabilistic theory,” he said.

While in college, Jones said he had no idea what he wanted to do “other than drink beer.”

“I was extraordinarily good at,” he joked….

Soon after, Jones found as a college student he could relate to the profession.

“Literally that weekend, I read a story on a guy named Richard Dennis, who was the biggest local at the Board of Trade. And then he used to say that he did his best trading when he was hungover because there was no emotion. And I thought, hmm, this is starting to get close to what I’m culturally pretty good at,” he recalled.

How Paul Tudor Jones’ love for beer and games got him into trader [Yahoo Finance]

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