Incoming Goldman Sachs CEO Thinks Everyone At 200 West Street Should At Least Try To Land Their EDM Single On The Billboard Charts

David Solomon wants more Work-Turnt Life Balance at his new Goldman.
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In case y'all don't follow the Billboard dance music charts as closely as we do, here's a fun little item from this week's new additions list:

DJ D-SOL

New York City-based DJ D-Sol (aka David Soloman) – and, in his day job, Goldman Sachs COO – debuts at No. 39 on Billboard's Dance/Mix Show Airplay chart (dated July 28) with "Don't Stop." The remix of the 41-year old Fleetwood Mac classic (the original peaked at No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in September 1977) is the DJ/business executive's first Billboard chart entry. "Don't" owes its debut to airplay on SiriusXM's BPM and WCPY Chicago, according to Nielsen Music.

It's pretty hard to compete with David Solomon's July 2018, you guys. Not only does his new single drop almost immediately onto the dance charts, but he also got a fun promotion at work!

But like any DJ who has to hold down a civilian gig just to pay the electric bill, D-Sol is very into managing his work-life balance, and at his Goldman Sachs, so will everyone. According to CNBC, Solomon has been making it sound like things at 200 West Street are going to substantially more dope as fuck under his leadership...

Goldman Sachs’ next chief executive officer and chairman, David Solomon, often talks about his personal interests, including an unusual side gig as a dance club disc jockey. Now, he wants his leaders to open up.

Ummm, that is adorable!

To help foster connections with employees and clients, Solomon said that "leaders today have to be more vulnerable, they have to put themselves out there a lot more than they probably are comfortable doing," said Levine.

"More vulnerable?" Was Gary Cohn's emo goth phase not enough for you people? Have you not read John Rogers' "Lloyd Blankfein as sexy vampire" fanfic? Does Marty Chavez need to show you his other, private, tattoos?

What firm is more synonymous with vulnerability than Goldman Sachs, the opaque global financial giant that resides in an unmarked glass tower in a purposefully, oddly remote section of lower Manhattan and is run by people with a habit of moving deftly in and out of the federal government?

But under DJ D-Sol, 200 West Street is turning into a totally open space, chock full of poet warriors who better show some serious fucking improvement in their trading business. And if he has to, the newest addition to the Billboard dance charts will lead by vulnerable-bro-with-outside-interests example...

"It's something I'm really passionate about," Solomon said in the podcast. "If you can't find a way to have passions and pursue those passions and mix them into your professional life and your personal life, it's just harder to have the energy to keep on doing this."

And he's not just a fan of dropping sick beats, he's a fan of his own emotions...

Solomon may be uniquely suited for the new Goldman. Where Blankfein is known for a quick wit, Solomon is more likely to come off as disarmingly earnest. The day after a ceremony where he was formally introduced by Blankfein as his successor, Solomon spoke to a roomful of the bank's interns, expressing wonder that he would soon be running the place.
"When Lloyd called me up at the stage, I was pretty emotional about it, it really affected me," Solomon said. "I was shaking."

This is going to be so great for us.

Billboard Dance Chart Upstarts: D-Sol, Excision & Illenium and Said the Sky [Billboard]

Goldman's next CEO wants a more human and open firm, urges his team to 'be more vulnerable' by sharing their personal lives [CNBC]

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